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  1. Dang forgot to update here - the pickup is mostly done at this point. Just details to cleanup. more X1/9 also got an upgrade
    6 points
  2. I'd like to take some time and document some of the progress I've been making on my car. I've spent more money and effort on the car in the last two years than probably the last ten years combined. I've had a handful of 850s before this one, but this has been my favorite by a long shot. So, I like my Volvo... and you guys probably know how the rest goes. 😄 The story of this particular car, a 1996 850 Turbo in Platinum trim goes a little like this: ~late 2010/early 2011, while in my black T5-R, I see a fellow Volvo owner filling up at a gas station. I pull in to the pump next to his to get some gas and strike up a conversation, "That's a really nice car that you've got there..." I ended up talking with the owner for about 45 minutes that night and discussed all sorts of details. He bought the car new from a local dealership for his wife. They loved the car even though it was nearing 210k miles, but were thinking of purchasing something else (ultimately a Prius). I gave my contact information to the owner and told him if he ever wanted to sell it, I would be happy to buy it. Fast forward about a year and I get an email out of the blue from the owner telling me that he hasn't driven the car (about) since the last time we spoke. It's been parked in his apartment complex, and management wanted him to move it. We did some brief negotiating over the phone and he insisted on selling me the car for scrap value since he hasn't been taking care of it. After some reservation, I obliged - the last time I saw this car it was in good condition, but need some TLC. We meet at his complex, and his wife (and my late wife) are both with us. We strike up our conversation like the last time we met at the pumps and he tells me he wants to give me the car, no charge. I offer to give the money that we had previously discussed but he refuses. I drove away that day with a free Volvo 850 that needed some attention, albeit was still running well. Over the next couple months I got the car cleaned up and ready for another harsh Minnesota winter. Here's some of the only pics I have at the time I received it (with the snow tires): Fast forward ~3 years... We're back down in Georgia, and my wife passes away suddenly. As I'm sure you all can imagine, the car (and almost everything else in life) was neglected for the next year or so while I tried to pick up the pieces and raise my then 3 year old daughter. ~1 year later... I finally get around to manual swapping this car, and do it on a super budget. I hooked up with someone who was moving and just needed to unload parts and bought two complete manual swap kits for ~$400(?). I saved the best stuff and sold the rest to recoup my money, plus some. The car was doing great, piling on the miles and just being a Volvo. ~2018 I've been daily driving the car up until this point. I just started a new job with a well-known Japanese company. About two weeks in, on the way home, the oil pressure light started flickering. I realized at this point I was going to need to pull the pan and replace the sump o-rings (again... lol). I gave some careful thought and decided now was the time for me to buy a new vehicle. I purchased my first new car, a 2018 Toyot Tundra... and the Volvo was parked in my shop where it lived for the next year or so as I found the intermittent motivation to work on it. The year(s) of the Covid... Now I'm spending a lot of time at home (working from home) and saving a bunch of money by not commuting in a 14 mpg 4wd truck (fml...), and the seed for a new hobbie is planted - 3d printing. Of course I go in cautious and get a glimpse of the silly things I can make and then my wallet jumps out of my pocket, so to speak. I'm going to do my best to document as many changes as I can that have occurred since 2020 and some of the things I'm still working on. As of today, the mod list on the car is extensive. At a high level, here's what I'm working with: B5234T9 - '04 C70 T5 - refurbed B5254T(?) dual VVT head - 2006 S60 2.5T Aaron tune - in progress still. ~1,100 kg/hr Ported Japanifold Gasket matched N/A intake manifold N/A throttle body Hybrid K24, billet 11 blade 54.50/68 compressor and 9-blade turbine DW 1000cc injectors DW 300 fuel pump Do88 radiator/fmic KW v3 320mm front brakes IPD sway bars General refresh of maintenance and consumables Pictures! (next post)
    5 points
  3. Off to its new home. Big Volvo guy. Getting it for his daughters to drive. I’m a little sad, but happy knowing it’s going to a good home, and also relieved that I only have one older car and no impending projects. My daughters were a sad and going to miss Daddy’s Red Race Car. But happy when I said we’re keeping the gray race car.
    5 points
  4. Minor tinkering tonight. Started to remove the manifold to get dimensions of the pcv box top, and ended with finally cutting the corner off of the ported RN manifold I have. I've got the Deeworks adapter already, so maybe this is the opportunity I have to switch to this manifold. My understanding is that it flows more (+HP top-end), but has a smaller plenum (-mid range)... which has kind of been the theme of this car. It's pretty sleepy and docile below 3,200 RPM, but after that, power comes on like a light switch. I like it. Some cutting was required at the passenger side of the plenum in order to clear the PS resevoir, but I don't see that making much difference. It should be a good comparison flow-wise because this manifold and the N manifold it will replace were matched using the same gasket... and grinder. lol The old with a comparison to N turbo manifold.
    5 points
  5. Results are looking great. Everything is lining up, but I'm sure I'll need to tweak the elbow.
    5 points
  6. I'm running a 1/0 marine grade tinned copper cable from the starter positive terminal, around the passenger side of the engine bay - following the main harness into the cabin. The cable passes through the factory access point and down along the passenger rocker panel, finally into the the trunk where I've placed a 150A circuit breaker. The battery has been mounted on the passenger side of the trunk. I'm not really happy with my solution for the original battery... so still thinking how I would like to improve it. Maybe I do end up with an optima and billet hold down. Here's some pictures I took when plotting the route. I removed the cable to cover it with a conduit before finall install. I'm not sure that I've ever seen 400 whp flow through the stock box... Mine basically started having issues around ~300 whp. You can see in my graph on page 1, my RPMs were increasing, but airflow was staying the same or dropping.
    3 points
  7. Almost 20 years. I bought it with 67,000 miles, it currently has 342,000. It has been my daily driver the entire time, except when I break it racing.
    3 points
  8. The bumper adapter only solves one piece of the problem though. The main issue was the 850 air box (used in combination with a C70 T5 lid and 3 in. MAF). From the data logs I could see that once the car made~ 850 kg/hr, the airflow would stall/drop as the engine speed increased. During one of my junkyard trips, I found a fresh, 2006 S60 T5 with the B5244T5, K24 and P2R air box. I grabbed the turbo and air box thinking I may use them one day. The day is today. The next step comes mounting the P2R air box in the 850. The larger filter used in that box should allow adequate flow. Along with the large opening of the air box, and proximity to the bumper opening, I should be able to get a straight shot into the air box from the bumper. This sounds promising... but also has obstacles - the battery, for one. The battery is getting relocated to the trunk with 1/0 marine grade cable. The first idea is to create a multipiece bracket that utilizes the old battery tray bolt locations and two locations on the frame rail. I printed the first piece and it does what it should. However, I quickly realize that I'm being me and making this more complicated than it needs to be. I call an audible and create this: I'll support this with a piece of aluminum stock underneath, so this really serves as just a spacer... but, it works like a charm. (and you can see that I've got the cams locked in this photo. The VVT hubs are worn so the car is currently down.) I've got everything lined up thanks to a 3 in. to 2.75 in. 90* reducer at the turbo and a 60* mandrel bent 3 in. pipe that is cut to length. I will braze fittings to this pipe for PCV hose and TCV reference line. I've definitely overlooked some milestones in the progress on this car. This brings me to where the car is currently. I'm going to try and do better at photographing along the way.
    3 points
  9. 3D printing project number one: an air intake that allows for more, cooler air that the factory intake above the radiator. The plan is to utilize thhe bumper opening on the driver's side to get fresh air. I think I've seen an accessory at IPD that works for later model Volvos, but there's no off-the-shelf part that does this for an 850. My plan is to 3d print a part that can be fastened to the bumper and connect a hose to. This needs to be a good sized hose though. I think the IPD accessory is <2 in.? I started out with this concept: and through ~30+ changes, arrived at the final product that's both easy to print and looks great. With the help of some brass inserts, a face plate, six M4 screws, and a short section of 3 in. ID pipe, we arrive at the end result. I'm also happy to say that once installed, it easily can go unnoticed:
    3 points
  10. New wheels, old bumper, no spoiler. After several logs and new tunes from Aaron, the car is running well. At this point, I focus on simple QoL improvements with the swap and getting everything to look nice-ish. Bend your own fuel lines to go over the cover. You can also see the TME sway bar that I refinished. This is as close to stock as the engine bay will ever look. I drive the car for ~1,500 miles like this. I'm happy, the car is happy... and then the first failure occurrs. The K24 suffers a catastrophic thrust bearing failure. The engine/trans comes back out to pull the turbo and oil pan and make sure I get as much metal out of this thing as possible. Witness marks on the housing: At this point, I've already collected two spare K24s, and this one is still under the 6 month warranty from LKQ. So, a quick phone call and they're sending out a replacement - that was easy. I get with Aaron and discuss how I want to proceed. The idea is a nice K24 now that can reach upper 300s (as I prep the fuel system for e85) and a large frame turbo later... which lends itself to the ideal 'while you're in there' scenario. So, one of the spare turbos get sent off to G-Pop for rebuild and hybrid. ...while I'm here, probably should add a Quaife... As I continue to wait for the rebuilt turbo, I look at what I've got on the shelf and grab the best exhaust housing and go to town cleaning it up. Two weeks later... The turbo comes in from G-Pop, everything looks phenomenal. Money well spent. Engine and trans are assembled and reintsalled. The K24 requires removing the compressor housing to get to the rear engine mount. The turbo goes in and my first taste of traction in an 850 hits me. It's definitely a transformative mod. I love it... and need it. Even with the quaife, the car is spinning the tires as boost builds in first gear, but there's a problem. The new turbo is flowing too much for the 850 air box. My interim work around for this is a K&N pod filter directly on the maf. This works great when the car is moving, but the performance hit is serious once I hit traffic and the engine bay heat soaks. Time to work on another idea - get more air into the turbo, from outside of the engine bay. To be continued... ...but the car is lacking in the looks department. My buddy has had my replacement R bumper and R spoiler for a few months now, so time to get those back. Paint color is not a perfect match, but the price was good and I've come to the realization that in order to get everything on the car to match, I'll need to paint the whole car. Now comes the 3d printing hobby. I've decided to improve on some aspects of what the 850 came with.
    3 points
  11. The replacement engine was taken down to the block and rotating assembly for inspection/cleaning/maintenance. I shimmed the block and used an S60R MLS head gasket. I spent a little time cleaning up the ports. No heavy changes, just smoothing out the rough casting. With the engine out, and waiting on the UPS man to show up, I tackled the interior. I pulled all the carpet to clean with the pressure washer, pulled the dash to repair the mounts, and pulled the headliner to recover... and that's when I found the source of my leaking sunroof. Engine is in and doing some tuning/driving/testing... The car is missing a bunch of pieces but running well now... Driving around on these old janky pegs leaves a lot to be desired. Time for new wheels.
    3 points
  12. Happy to announce the P2R setup is finally in. Findings are promising. Previous max from 1078 kg/hr with the open filter, to a new peak of 1105 kg/hr! Needless to say, the car is running well... and it's getting closer to the switch to e85! I've already incorporated some QoL changes to the air box snorkel for a v1.1 that will reduce the amount of filament to print it, increase the size of the opening into the air box, and result in a much better overall install and polished product... including addressing the odd mounting bolt location as seen inside of the air box. also upgraded PCV lines to 12an fittings. There's still a restriction (relative) to being true 12an at the catch can - I'm using 10an orb to 12an male fittings. Perhaps, down the road, there's a better breather box in the works.
    2 points
  13. Temp sensor is easy. You can do it at the same time you are doing the PCV system. It may also be the reason you are running rich. Pulling the intake manifold off is the hardest part of the PCV system replacement, but not really that big of a deal.
    2 points
  14. Long story short; After several hundred kms of testing I came to a conclusion that none of the currently available bins with 609 values (LPT maps in them) work 100% in my 305 based car. So what I've done is created an xdf for 305bin myself. Not only the car works like a charm, I've made some changes to the VE map so that I can run E85 if I so desire, changed the injector constant, dead times and some other basic stuff. Next step is to transfer the logging code in to the 305bin. Which atm is giving me a headache
    2 points
  15. I decided to put the RN manifold project on hold so that I could get the car back on the road. Unfortunately, I'm not sure how long it'll be on hold. Seems like it may be a better idea to figure out a custom manifold setup with the combination of short runners and large(er) plenum. We'll see. Nonetheless, the P2R air box is in, battery relocated to the trunk, PCV system upgraded to 12AN hose.... and new cam hubs installed. I took the car out for a test drive last night and I'm happy to report no more flow restriction through the air box, like was the case with the 850 box. 👍 Still to do: work on the inlet adapter for the air box to accomodate the 3" hose from the bumper inlet.
    2 points
  16. Did the SCCA Track Night at Atlanta Motorsport Park last week.
    2 points
  17. After 12,5 years of ownership it was time to let her go. Bought something completely opposite. Didn’t want a 6 cilinder, dark exterior and tan interior…guess what I ended up with😄 T6 AWD ticking a lot of boxes. Missing the T5 grunt but overall it’s a nice substitute.
    2 points
  18. Totally agree ^ - i actually made an offer on a 15.5 xc70 t6 with every single option a few months ago now and glad i didnt get it - 98k miles 23k doll hairs. thats nuts. ill let someone else eat that crazy markup haha. this is why i sold my gti and only have the R. The kids rarely are with me or if they are we are all together in the xc90. im working from home mostly. I keep asking myself why do i have the R? to fucking drive it and enjoy it. fitting my dual exhaust xc bumper today on it and welding full 3" dual exhaust this weekend. want to get it like you said... where I can enjoy cleaning it not rebuilding every corner of it haha.
    2 points
  19. Alignment and AC all squared away.
    2 points
  20. Yeaaahh. And it’s not that I don’t have the physical time to do it since I go in the garage at night when everyone is in bed, but I found it taking up too much of my mental space. Times when I should be present but find myself thinking about what I need to do, order, etc. I’m ready to cool it for a bit.
    2 points
  21. It's not like anyone didn't see this one coming. After some internal debates with myself and great conversation with one of my best friends who is solely responsible for my interest in cars, I've decided to scale back the time and energy I spend on cars and refocus that energy on my family. With that said, once the 850R is done and I drive it for a bit to make sure everything is OK, I'm going to list it for sale. I bought the car to fill a gap when the e30 was being worked on long term and I only had the XC70. It did its job and now it doesn't serve the same purpose for me. If you're interested or know anyone who might be interested, let me know. The bottom line is this car won't win any concourse awards, but nor should it. It's a driver that is in great shape, mechanically ready to go anywhere, and looks good doing it. Will also come with a set of OEM roof racks. I drove this last winter and on the coldest days it always started without hesitation. A run down of the maintenance I've done to it: Koni Strt shocks/struts Meyle HD control arms, ball joints, inner/outer tie rod ends, strut mounts, and spring seats Front and rear engine mounts, transmission torque mount, right side engine mount, IPD poly upper torque bushing, and firewall mount. New vacuum lines Rebuilt 15G turbo with new CBV New air filter IPD subframe bushing inserts New catback exhaust with suitcase muffler. No exhaust leaks and it's very quiet (in a good way, I think) Trunk struts Bosch ignition coil Bosch distributor cap and rotor New Bosch Copper spark plugs New battery Serpentine Belt OEM firewall heater hose pass through IPD/do88 silicone heater hoses OEM coolant hoses Intercooler hoses GROM blue tooth module New wiper blades Curt trailer hitch, Euro ball, and wiring. Rear trailing arm delta links The previous completed the following shortly before the sale (within a few hundred miles): Volvo OEM PCV system Alternator Starter Timing belt kit and water pump 302 brake rotors with rebuilt calipers and Bosch pads Front SS brake lines Radiator Cam Seals Heater Core (can confirm it looked very new) Coolant reservoir Cabin filter (it's clean) Front fender lines Serpentine Belt Tensioner Odometer gear New (used) ABS controller Volan wheels refinished (full Volan spare) Previous previous owner installed a strut bar, had the windows tinted, fuel pump, rear trailing arm bushings . It was also repainted at one point in its life. But they did a great job. There are no runs and when it's actually clean it looks fantastic. The carfax lists three accidents in its life: something from the rear (this was in 1998, so there's no info), a PS sideswipe (2005), and DS sideswap (2021). The DS sideswipe is when the lady rubbed her tires on the car that I had posted. Notes in the carfax say that airbags didn't deploy with any of the accidents. I've had the car on the lift and it pretty well taken apart and there's no evidence of anything to the frame. Still has original stickers and undercoating and everything. The not so greats: Little bit of rust on the bottom of the trunk lid where it meets the bumper. I've had it on all three of my 850s. Sunroof closes a little wonky sometimes and during HEAVY rains I've seen a couple drips coming in throuh the DS pillar - this is likely the drain tube has a small leak. The headlight wiper motors are disconnected. Don't know why, they just are. The DS seat has some wear. There aren't any rips, but the leather has some cracks. But the suede is in great shape. The other seats look great. Small dent in the rear PS door that could be removed with PDR.
    2 points
  22. With the air box fitted, I was able to finish up the intake pipe. There's a 1/4 npt bung for TCV reference line and a 12an bung for catch can return. I'm going to take this opportunity to move up to 12 an fittings for the breather setup. I've loosely designed a plate that I'm going to have laser cut from aluminum for the top of the PCV box - I'm using the RN box currently. I don't have a spare box that I can measure so I'll have to pull the one from the car and check it. I'll cut the outlets flush and braze a couple an fittings onto the plate, then glue/screw it to the box top. I've never been a fan of the solutions that I've come up with. This should put an end to any concerns with the system and serviceability of it. I ran the positive cable for the battery relocation and working on a battery hold-down that accepts the factory-sized battery. I'm not a fan of Optimas, and not really up to paying the $400-500 for Li tech... yet. And designed a plate for the laser cutter to mount my two service points in the engine bay for (+) and (-). This will mount on top of the piece of the car that holds the grommet for the air box. I spent most of the day today getting some needed upgrades done to the 3d printer. I went with the BTT SKR mini E3 v3.0 main board and TFT35 3.0 display. I've got one more upgrade to do with a direct drive extruder, but that will wait for another day.
    2 points
  23. VVT hubs are worn out on the car. Oil leaking at the cams, and a bunch of slop - especially the exhaust. New ones on order. I was able to get my battery rotated sideways, but ultimately decided it just needs to go in the trunk. I've got some 1/0 marine cable and terminals to run it out back. This frees up a bunch of room up front for intake options. I'm going to try and retro a P2R air box into the 850. I'm still using 940 MAF, so I printed an adapter to take care of that. I'm going to make my own intake pipe to the box. I'm also going to work on printing a large snorkel for the box that will connect to the bumper inlet with 3" hose.
    2 points
  24. Made some additional progress on the RN intake manifold. Still a work in progress, but looks promising.
    1 point
  25. I made a post on the Wisconsin Volvo facebook group that I was going to be listing it and he messaged me right away. He was a cool guy. Dailying the e30 for now until I find something new.
    1 point
  26. @Emiel dude I loved your s60😢
    1 point
  27. Not holding my breath, but might be sold already. Ran home a little early today to get some pictures due to a rainy weekend coming up. That’s ridiculous. Like I love Volvos, but there are “better” cars with more tech for less. I’ll likely be looking at Q5’s primarily.
    1 point
  28. Having the R and the e30 doesn't make sense to me. They're from the same era, but I prefer the BMW. Man, I always try looking for a newer Volvo for a DD, but the prices for them are insane. Like the prvious generation V60s I like. But for a 2015 with almost 100k miles they're going for $25k! And then it wasn't until the newest generation of Volvos were they even on par with other manufacturers for tech. So it's like you pay more for outdated technology. Idk. I like the P2 XC90s, and those are relatively affordable. But they're big. And I don't need/want a car that big when I'm by myself 90% of the time. I honestly don't know what I want. I just know that I don't want the 850 and the e30.
    1 point
  29. It looks so good. Beautiful rainy weekend coming up to take pictures of it. 🫠
    1 point
  30. yeah i picked it all up today - now to get the old rusted shit off
    1 point
  31. I’m going to list it at $7,900. There aren’t any comps right now. The old ones I found were a little bit less for some that had significant issues and super clean ones for quite a bit more. I figure this may not be the garage queen that some purists are looking for, but it's a well sorted 850R that's ready to be driven and enjoyed. At the shop today for a four wheel alignment and charging the AC. It’s dirty, but man was it a quiet ride on the way to work.
    1 point
  32. Not yet on the box, but I haven't got the car on the road again yet. Still down for the VVT hubs. The factory box was just over powered by how the hybrid k24 comes on, so I had to go to the open filter... If I can fit this air box and have no issues, that would be great. My fall back is too just build a new air box behind the driver's headlight.
    1 point
  33. Been loving your build, such a clean car and fast too. I just got a resin printer, so let me know if you need anything aesthetic printed at very high resolution.
    1 point
  34. Not sure about the scooter, but the Peugeot has my attention. One I just finished for myself One for a friend of mine, just waiting on a new saddle. One I built for our nanny last year. We probably have 13 bikes in the house, currently.
    1 point
  35. Just as I was feeling good about how the car was doing... my stupid a** drove over a parking stop while leaving the store last week. Slammed down on the subframe mount. I was worried I bent a tie rod or control arm, but fortunately all that stuff looks fine. The fresh scrapes led me to this, though... Popped the bushing out a little bit, which would explain the slight sloppiness I could feel in the front end. Just ordered a new bolt, so hopefully it'll be as simple as pulling it apart and popping the bushing back in.
    1 point
  36. I still need to source an OTE pipe for my RIP kit on my V70R. Kristian is backed up indefinitely, so I'll have to figure it out.
    1 point
  37. Recently sent my OTE pipe to Snabb to have a BOV flange welded. Installed that, along with the new metal section of intake tube and Snabb intake. Pardon the dirty engine bay.
    1 point
  38. We can post again.
    1 point
  39. Yeah, we can let this thread die. Still supporting the wannabe dictator?
    1 point
  40. Over the last month: The Volvo can hit 22 psi now without blowing pipes off. About time to go racing with it again. Fixed a broken headlight bulb retaining spring on my headlights. Since I have custom headlights, I ordered a bunch of random springs and found one close enough that I could modify to work. Drained the catch can. I need a bigger one so I don't have to do it every other weekend, but it is definitely working. Installed Wilwood brakes on the front of the spider. Still trying to bleed them correctly. I'm used to 10-11mm bleed screws, but the Wilwood's use 1/4" on the calipers I have. It took me a hour just to find a 1/4" wrench; 7mm is too big, 6mm is too small. My bleed hose barely fits on them. I'll be working on them again today to try and finish up. A bunch of other stuff I've already forgotten about.
    1 point
  41. Hey P80 owners! I thought I’d document the installation of my new fuel pump and relay hardwire kit since I haven’t seen a detailed write-up on this yet. It’s a pretty straightforward installation, but I am very amateur when it comes to doing electrical work, so I had to rely on some other knowledgeable community members to get it done right. Now, I want to pass on what I’ve learned for anyone in the future who may install a similar device for their fuel system. Or perhaps, maybe after reading this, you’ll consider upgrading your own fuel pump wiring. In this DIY, I will be showing you how I installed the Deatschwerks “FPHWK” or “Fuel Pump Hard Wire Kit” into my 1998 C70 coupe, and later paired with a new Deatschwerks DW200 fuel pump. I found out while working, there is some variation between the P80 models as to how the fuel pumps are mounted and wired, so you’ll want to make sure you understand your own car first. Compared to other fuel pump DIYs for 850s and X70 cars, my car seemed to have a mix of their features – Probably a result of this being a 97-98 X70 car. NOTE: If you have an AWD car, you’ll have a blast trying to get to the fuel pump anyway, as it’s located underneath the rear seats behind sheet metal. I was fortunate enough to have an easy access panel right in the trunk. Luckily, if you already have an aftermarket fuel pump installed, you will not need to remove it in order to install the relay kit. You just need access to the pump wiring outside of the tank and you may want to put the relay in your interior somewhere. Before I being, just a reminder that I am a complete amateur with wiring, so this may seem like a no-brainer to some people, but I feel it may be helpful for people like me who still equate electricity to some kind of wizard’s magic. By all means, if you see a way to do anything differently or better, please share your experiences! This is a relatively simple install. The hardest part for me was routing the wire in the interior. Oh, and before you do any of this, it might go without saying, but… UNPLUG YOUR BATTERY! Never work on electrical connections until you are sure there is no power running to them, especially when that project involves working near gasoline! What it is... I’ll start by going over the relay kit and what it does exactly… Essentially, this is substituting for your factory fuel pump wiring and providing a more reliable and more direct power supply from your battery to your new, aftermarket, higher output fuel pump. The factory wiring may work in many cases, but you won’t be getting the most of your aftermarket pump investment and you risk overloading the factory wires from the additional draw. The relay is basically a power switch and it uses your factory fuel pump wiring signal to turn it on when the key is put into Ignition Pos. II, sending a new direct 12v line to your pump with less potential voltage drop. Here is the spec sheet straight from Deatschwerks. It’s color-coded so it’s very easy to understand. If you're knowledgeable, you could easily duplicate this with your own relay and wires, but the kit is about $50 and quality is excellent, so it's well worth the peace of mind. Plan on buying some extra 12awg stranded wire and basic crimp connectors, ring terminals, heat srhink, etc. You will likely need to extend the power wire. Mine ended up being about 8 inches short of the battery terminal but as I note later on, I made my connection in the interior for ease of routing wires and accessing the provided fuse. This diagram shows how the relay is added to the circuit. Note how the grey OEM connector is now used to provide a “signal” to the relay. The factory power wire (pink/red on my car) connects to the blue relay wire to tell it to activate when the car is on. The black wire coming out of this connector can simply be terminated. As far as I know, it’s not connected to anything live once the pump wiring is detached. You will have 12v power coming into the relay (red wire) and out of the relay (yellow) where it will connect to the power wire (red) on the fuel sending unit. Both the fuel sending unit and relay have black ground wires that you will want to connect to a solid, bare metal surface in the trunk with ring terminals. If all this sounds confusing, don’t worry, I’ll show you exactly what I did with each wire down below. It took me ages to make sense of this honestly very simple schematic. In the trunk of the C70/S70, under the floor behind the rear seats, you will find this black plastic junction box containing numerous connectors. You will only need to focus on the grey fuel pump connector which is 2nd closest in this picture. The stock power wire coming into the connector on my car is pink, but turns to red as it goes to the fuel sending unit. This may differ on your car. Also worth noting, I think some cars have an additional short ground wire coming out of this connector with a ring terminal on the end. I’m not sure exactly why, but my car does not have that and it seems to be a nonissue. Here is what the relay looks like. The blue signal wire and yellow power-out wire are really short, so you’ll want to place this relay close to where the fuel pump and connector are, unless you want to extend them with more wire. Comparatively, there is plenty of red power wire and a black ground wire that is way longer than needed, in case you want to ground somewhere besides the trunk. Annoyingly, the red power wire comes with the inline 25 amp fuse already attached, so if you plan to route the wire through the car interior like I did, you will need to cut this fuse off and reattach it. Otherwise you will have no chance of fitting it through the various nooks and crannies up to the engine bay. Installing the Relay... Running the power Wire The first thing I did was start running the power wire through the interior. I chose to do this since the wire is critical for the car to run and I want it to be protected from the elements as much as possible. This was by far the most difficult and time-consuming part of the job, but mostly because it required removing a lot of interior panels, carpet, and the passenger seat. I decided to mount my relay on the strut tower on the passenger side (LHD car) where there is a convenient foam pass-through on the upper corner of the rear seat that was perfect for starting the wire. This pic is just behind the plastic side panel in the trunk. Using long piece of thick wire (unbent coat hanger works), I was able to feed the wire diagonally down toward the passenger side door sill. It was a joyous occasion when I finally saw the other end of it! This may take a few tries and you may need to remove the rear seat to loosen the plastic side panel a bit for extra room. S70/V70s might be a little easier with less dead space to blindly feed a wire into. Next, I ran the wire along the door sill under the carpet. Nothing special here, just be careful not to break your interior trim and clips when you remove them. Pretty self-explanatory. After the door sill, I ran the wire under the passenger footwell carpet and then up towards the center stack where the radio is. I originally wanted to put the wire along the firewall, but I could not find any easy way to get around the heater core, so instead I ran the wire behind the radio. With the radio pulled out, it’s easy to tug this wire over to the driver’s side and come out the same area. Working in the driver’s side footwell, this is where I decided to reattach the provided 25a fuse for easy access under the kickpanel (sorry, I forgot to take a pic of that fuse). From that fuse onward, I felt that the provided power wire was not actually long enough to reach my battery, so I purchased more 12awg stranded automotive wire to continue the job. Getting through the firewall was no easy task… or so I initially thought until I discovered this conduit above the dead pedal area that the previous owner ran the boost gauge vacuum line through. It took a little bit of wiggling, but I was finally able to push the wire out into the engine bay. This conduit exits under the brake booster. It’s a little hard to see. I should also mention there was a rubber grommet on the end of the tube that has 4 nipples that can be cut off and used. I’m not sure what Volvo intended to put here if all my lines going in here were not factory... Anyway, I had a seriously hard time getting the thick new 12awg wire through the hole so I just cut the grommet off instead. I really don’t see a need for it unless you are fording rivers in your Volvo, hoping to keep your feet dry. The tube is long and mounted high up in the firewall. After pulling it through the conduit I ran the wire along this… thing. I can’t be bothered to identify it right now but just know it’s a good place to get the wire under the airbox and up to the battery, haha. Finally, after all that fishing, I crimped on a ring terminal and connected it directly to the positive (red) battery terminal. It sandwiches nicely under the factory loom connection. Now we are done running the power wire! This was honestly the hardest work for me, so take a break when you’ve made it this far. Installing the Relay in the Trunk... Now working in the trunk (or under the back seat if you’re unfortunate enough to have AWD) we can start modding the factory fuel pump connector. This step is a little scary because it involves permanently cutting your factory pump wiring. Fear not, you can always re-splice the connections or simply buy a new fuel sending unit for $40~ if you mess something up. It was recommended to me to cut off the fuel pump connector about 3-4 inches away from the end. This leaves you enough wire from the pump to the relay, and the connector to the relay, as these parts will now go their separate ways. I decided the perfect location for my relay was on the strut tower. It’s right in-between the plug and fuel sending unit and aligned with both pretty well. It also provides a good grounding surface if you sand off the paint. I mounted the relay and the ground wires for the pump and the relay itself on this bracket. Everything is held in place by a self-tapping sheet metal screw. The signal and power wires are a bit spaghetti-like, but hopefully my photo is not too confusing. All the extra wire was shoved pretty nicely up in front of the strut tower and zip-tied in place. Instead of a normal crimp connector, I put a “bullet” style quick-disconnect between the fuel pump and yellow power wire so that I can rapidly remove the fuel sending unit again if I need to. To test the relay is working, turn your key to POS. II and listen for the relay to click on and your fuel pump should begin pressurizing the system. You will need to cycle this a few times before the car will start. Then, let it idle for a bit and make sure it doesn’t die. Amazingly I had zero issues and was quite proud I hadn't messed up any of the connections. So… that should be it for installing the relay. Unfortunately I still had work to do installing the aftermarket pump which I thought the previous owner had already done with a Walbro 255, but in fact it still had the factory Bosch pump in place. Thank goodness I checked! Installing Deatschwerks Fuel Pump... I won’t go into too much detail about installing the fuel pump, because there are already plenty of good write-ups and videos out there for various P80 cars and I forgot to take certain pics... and don’t want to take the pump back out, lol). I recommend RobertDIY’s video on replacing the pump here. And here is another great video on it. I do just want to note some things regarding the particular fuel pump I chose and some things I learned during the install. First of all, I recommend a metal trim puller tool for disconnecting the factory fuel lines. It’s the perfect size and shape for prying the connectors up from underneath without damaging anything. Some people use bent screwdrivers... a fork... crowbar... whatever works for you. I also found that oil filter pliers work great for loosening the plastic retaining ring that holds the sending unit in place. It should give you plenty of grip and leverage to work in that tight space from various angles. They do make a tool specifically for this, but there’s no need unless you're a Volvo purist and want all the service tools in your collection, haha. Also worth noting… you’ll want to allow yourself an extra 15 minutes for acorn removal! Volvo is so environmentally conscious, they made this nice little home for your critter friends! I swear this is just part of regular Volvo maintenance at this point, based on how many pictures of other P80s I’ve seen in this exact same situation, lol. A shop vac and screwdriver made quick work of this mess. NOTE: With the sending unit removed from the tank, you may want to cover your fuel tank opening so debris cannot get in, but also to keep fumes from coming out. I duct taped a piece of flat Rubbermaid plastic over the plastic retaining ring and screwed it back into place temporarily as a makeshift cap. Here is the new Deatschwerks DW200 fuel pump and how it compares in size/shape to the factory Bosch unit. The Deatschwerks pump was recommended to me by multiple people as an alternative to the popular Walbro 255. The DW200 has a comparable flow rate but supposedly runs quieter. This pump is good for… more horsepower than most of us would ever need. If you think you need more, go for a DW300. When fitting the DW200 into the factory plastic housing, I did have to dremel out most of the ribs so the larger diameter pump could fit snugly down into the tube. You can use any fuel sock you prefer so long as it’s clean and it fits well in your tank. I had no issues with the DW200’s additional length because it extends upward into the sending unit. The DW200 pump connects directly into the stock plug in the sending unit, so there’s no need to swap anything out here. I’ve heard from some people that the Deatschwerks pump has reverse polarity, but after doing a bench test with my battery and a bucket of acetone, I found that the pump ran the same direction as stock. I was also informed that despite being lower gauge wire from the pump to the 12 gauge relay kit, it’s not a big issue as the voltage drops would be negligible. You are good to use the connector without any modification.Just make sure your pump isn't running backwards or you'll have to rewire the plug! One thing I did find kind of strange was this sort of grounding contraption that runs from the connector and attaches to the outlet tubes and fuel pump body with metal springs. I’m not entirely sure what this is for, but I assume is has something to do with protecting against static electricity. It’s probably a safety device that’s important to retain, which is another reason I’d recommend leaving the factory plug in place if you can. I saw no mention of this wire in other fuel pump DIYs so I thought I'd add it here. Once it’s all re-installed and the cover panel is in place, the fuel pump upgrade is complete! I slapped a shiny DW sticker on there so potential future owners don’t have to second-guess what’s inside the tank like I had to. With the relay mounted on the strut tower, I had no clearance issues putting the protector and trunk interior back together. I don't know what that little ground wire is for that's connected to the top of the metal plate... but it was there when I took everything apart so I put it back where I found it. With the new pump, my car immediately behaved a lot better than before. It already had a RICA ECU tune and green injectors, but a stock fuel pump where it should have been upgraded already. My power delivery is definitely smoother and more consistent but the real test will be once I’ve got my new turbo and VA5T ECU next year. I must say, I am very pleased with the Deatschwerks pump. It is noticeably louder than stock, but not “loud” at all, like some Walbro users will often say. If anything, it actually makes cool spaceship sounds as it whirrs up under acceleration. All-in-all a very worthwhile upgrade and hopefully it should last. I’m hoping my childish wiring is robust enough too. Sorry for the extremely wordy and somewhat scatterbrained presentation, but I hope I helped someone out there who is in my same situation. Coming from zero electrical experience whatsoever, this was a bit overwhelming at times and I needed it explained to me about 100 times from various people before it finally clicked in my head. I’m hoping I can pass on this info and show you that it is really simple, it just takes a bit of patience and the right tools! This is also my first ever post on these forums, so I apologize if i didn't get this in the right place!
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  42. 12 hour round trip over the weekend and the car did great. I did throw a CEL for the stupid MAP/Baro sensor code (P0108) early on in the trip, so at the next gas stop I removed it threw it on the ground a couple times and re-installed it and all was well for the next 500 miles or so. This is the best this car has been in my ownership in every way. I'm ecstatic. I think I'm pretty much done working on it for this season, just going to enjoy driving it and focus on prepping for the 5 speed swap this coming winter.
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  43. I finally got the ride height dialed how I wanted it. This is all the way down on the Maxpeedingrods front coil overs for anyone who cares. I removed the lower adjusting collars, and the spring perch is now tightened down directly against the lower body of the coil-over. This is the stance I've wanted to achieve for a decade and the crazy thing is that it drives way smoother than the R which is on Koni Yellows and IPD springs.. Anyways, it's all aligned now, and the A/C is charged and working. All is good with this car right now.
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  44. Here's a little custom project I finished up yesterday. I know many of you will probably call me a masochist, but hear me out lol. So after I installed the aftermarket Kenwood head unit, the Dolby center speaker hasn't worked since. TBH there is no real need for it with the new setup. Since the C70 has no great pillar gauge pod options, I always thought it would be cool to replace the center speaker with a pod. So after a couple years of daydreaming about this, I finally dove in. I ordered a generic dual gauge pod from amazon, and then using a dremel, I flattened out the original mounting plate on the dash.. then a couple evenings of fiberglassing and smoothing/painting, I have a result that I'm happy with. This pod holds glowshift boost and Wideband A/F gauges as well as covers a passage for the radar detector wire to enter the dash. The finish is black hammered spray paint covered by a matte clear coat. it's not perfect, but matches the dash pretty well.
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  45. I guess most people won't even remember me, I wasn't that frequent here or done huge things, but man it feels great to randomly come back here (like 3rd time in the past 8 years) and see familiar faces. In the past 8 years I parted out my 850, built a 964 T5 a 945 T5. Currently having a 965 on coilovers, ad08 tyres starting a manual swap and preparing for T6 swap as well. Now I miss my 850.
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  46. I have the manual and Auto setbit. I have the AC mod, Injector calibration for Oranges, Whites/Blues, and Greens all single click patches. Same with the stock MAF, an S90 MAF, and a 3” and 3.25” MAF Housing. The Anti-Lag settings from the publicly available BIN interfere with the settings from the REV6 BIN that I am basing my XDF off of. There might be a way to switch between the fuel cut and Spark Cut launch control system, but the Anti-Lag uses the Alternative map when it engages. If anyone wants to help, let me know.
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  47. So.. it is more common then... I guess that the ones combining a M44 with a 850 TCU without having the error code were just Lucky then.. The code 3-3-5 doesn't affect the car's performance. The only annoyance is that it turns the lambda light on. You can fix this issue by simply change the value on address $F314 from CA to FF
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