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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/29/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    First drive went well except some small issues with the rear cv boots...
  2. 1 point
    Matt - did you also increase the ID of the rigid & plastic lines inside the senders? I had done that, along with cutting a chunk out of the main sender housing to allow more rapid drawback into the tank. Don't solder any harness connections moving forward - crimp all new terminals. I hope that IC is not as low as it appears! Definitely issues arise when running lowered suspension w/AWD. On my C30, over heavy highway bumps the ear on the CV Oetiker clamp hit the fuel tank filler hose - fortunately didn't cut through the hose in my case. My dampers were also set too soft, and I had to raise the spring seat 1" Good deduction on the boot OD & damper settings. Did you buy the later AWD front subframe tie brackets (the triangular ones)? They are more substantial than other model & earlier AWD version. 9480184 I'd look for a lower profile elbow for the AWD sump - that just looks ripe for snagging & ripping off if you go over any road debris.
  3. 1 point
    I have met 3 in person. It has been a while though.
  4. 1 point
    I can't blame you for getting side-tracked by the new truck - that LX570 looks really cool, those are super nice. My buddy picked up a J200 Land Cruiser (I forget which year) a little ways back and it's a really impressive vehicle. Yeah, I was really surprised by how much it helped out. Yeah, I'm running the 99 transmission mount on with the bracket Hussein made. Thanks! Yeah, I've been really impressed with the M12 impact so far. I use it for just about anything on the car I can. To pick up where I left off on my last post, I replaced the OEM battery cables with some upgraded cables I made myself - what I did is not very different than the "Big 3" upgrade described in this write-up. Most of you probably know that the stock cables are notorious for voltage drop as they age, especially on the 99/00 models. While I never experienced any voltage drop issues on this car, with a stereo system upgrade in the future, it was a good time to upgrade. To start, I removed the stock cables from the factory loom, which was the most tedious part of the whole process, and used them as templates to order new bulk cable and battery terminals from KnuKonceptz. I used 1/0 AWG Kolossus Flex for the main alternator/starter/battery cables, 4 AWG cable for the B+ cable to the main fusebox, and 8 AWG for the ground straps on the cylinder head. Given the stock alternator is rated at 125 amps, I used a reference chart from Crutchfield to verify the wire size for each new cable would meet/exceed the ampacity of the stock cables. The new alternator/starter/battery cables basically follow the stock routing, but are outside of the main engine harness - while the Kolossus Flex cable is flexible enough to follow the stock routing, unfortunately there was not enough room in the stock plastic housing for the new cables to fit. The cables are terminated with crimped-on ring terminals and adhesive-lined heat shrink boots. I used a pair of Bassik battery terminals - I'm not 100% sold on continuing to use them due to the space constraints caused by the stock airbox, but they were the best available choice in terms on physical size and still offering a variety of set screws to work with the ring terminals on the cables. I may try a pair of top-post "mil-spec" terminal from Napa at some point in the future. The 4 AWG wire fit fit neatly into the stock rubber boot and loom at the main fusebox. Form a 90* bend in the ring terminal inside the fusebox allowed it to join right up to the stock terminal post and keep everything clean/stock-looking. I replaced the 2 braided ground straps that run from the cam cover to the chassis with 8 AWG. And last but not least, I ran a length of 1/0 AWG from the battery to the truck to supply power a stereo amplifier and AC power inverter. The 1/0 fits through the drivers side accessory grommet, but just barely. I wanted to keep the "wiring train" rolling, so I ran all the wiring for my AEM WBO2 and boost gauges. During the engine swap last year, I had a friend add a bung to the stock downpipe. I am planning on adding a 3" downpipe in the near future, but it doesn't hurt to keep an eye on the AFRs in the meantime. Since there wasn't room in the accessory pass-through, I ran the WB wires through the firewall grommet on the drivers side of the car, then through an open spot on the fusebox to get behind/underneath the dashboard. The boost gauge and oil pressure gauge wiring fits neatly through the accessory pass-through with the stereo power cable. I'm using the previous-gen AEM UEGO, which utilizes a Bosch LSU 4.2 sensor. The current gen uses the newer Bosch LSU 4.9 sensor, and is much faster/more accurate. Conveniently, the LSU 4.2 sensor is the same as the stock front O2 sensor, and the plugs are even identical: This means I can quickly swap sensors between the ECU and the AEM gauge to troubleshoot if I suspect there's an issue with one of them. I made a sub-harness that connects to the stock accessory connector to supply power to all 3 A-pillar gauges (WBO2, boost, and future oil pressure): I replaced the stock accessory connector with a 6 pin weatherpack connector, then ran my relay so that everything is ignition-switched while ensuring there was adequate power supply (10 amps for WB02, <1 amp each for the other gauges). Each gauge plugs into one of the 2-pin weatherpack connectors, and allows me to easily remove one or all the gauges if needed. The junctions are properly parallel-spliced and heat-shrunk. I don't use solder for anything on a car - crimped joints are much more tolerant of the vibration that a car generates and will be more reliable in the long run. Using the proper crimp tool, weatherpack terminals are inexpensive, reliable and easy to terminate: You can save yourself the trouble and buy a pre-made harness from @JVC that plugs right into the stock accessory connector. I installed mine a few days before he put the F/S ad up, otherwise I would've bought one. One day this summer, I ran some errands, went back into my apartment, then came back out to finish unloading the car and saw this mess The piece of heater hose I used to delete the PCV banjo bolt system had failed and was leaking coolant. I pulled it apart, and went to install the stock hose/banjo bolt assembly and ran into a small snag: I'm running an 04 engine, but used the 00 thermostat housing so I can replace the thermostat without needing to remove the whole housing. As it turns out, the 04 PCV coolant hose needed to be trimmed to fit on the 00 housing. Once the hose was cut and the orientation adjusted, it was an easy install. Since I had previously deleted/blocked off the banjo bolt, I took the opportunity to install the updated banjo bolt with the internal check valve, PN 31325709. While I was in there, I replaced the thermostat and put a new o-ring on, and replaced the Reinz thermostat housing gasket with an OEM one. The Reinz gasket had slowly leaked ever since I installed it, so I'm glad that leak is gone. There's factory TSB that advises using 2 gaskets in that location to prevent leaks, but mine has been okay so far. I've got spare gaskets sitting on the shelf if problems arise. While I had the intake manifold off and everything torn apart, I replaced the worn-out vacuum check valves with new OEM valves (PN: 1275226 - thanks @B Mac) and most of the rubber vacuum lines with new silicone lines from FlexTech. The lines I replaced are the TCV lines, CBV line, and EVAP purge valve line. It may not seem like much, but I had been ignoring the vacuum lines since I swapped this engine into the car in January 2019 and I'm really glad I got that sorted out. Here's the stock P80 ME7 vacuum line diagram for reference: I used constant-tension clamps from Bel-Metric to keep each hose securely in place - no more messing around with zip ties to hold those lines on. It also gives the aftermarket lines a nice OEM+ appearance that I appreciate. I used several sizes of clamp based on the various OD sizes of the different hoses. I did not buy the CTC pliers, instead I used a pair of needle-nose vice grips. The vice grips made it easy to lock the clamp fully open, slide it into place, then slowly release the clamp in the orientation I wanted. Each clamp was placed so that future access with the needle-nose vice grips will be as easy as possible. Up next will the story of my injector woes
  5. 1 point