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lookforjoe

Hussein's 1998 V70 Xr : The Force Awakens

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Interesting. It might be beneficial to those with custom manifolds where the turbo sits too low to get a good angle into the stock drain. Can't hurt to drill/tap and then just cap it for potential future use.

Agreed. I wonder if my R block has this too.

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Agreed. I wonder if my R block has this too.

If you also have the castings in the block for the later T/stat (RN, "C" prepped?) (under intake near starter) then I would presume your carrier is also the same as mine.

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If you also have the castings in the block for the later T/stat (RN, "C" prepped?) (under intake near starter) then I would presume your carrier is also the same as mine.

If your block has it I'm sure mine does too.

Shoot me a pic once you get the pistons. I fear with the 93.2mm stroke of my crank I can't go with the 147mm rods. The wrist pin would probably intrude into the lowest oil ring. I'm awaiting response from Wiseco.

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If your block has it I'm sure mine does too.

Shoot me a pic once you get the pistons. I fear with the 93.2mm stroke of my crank I can't go with the 147mm rods. The wrist pin would probably intrude into the lowest oil ring. I'm awaiting response from Wiseco.

I'll have the pistons sometime tomorrow, chances are not early enough to put the block together, of course. I'll take pics. Just switching to 23mm pins brings it close - making the piston even shorter due to longer stroke maybe too much to ask for - hopefully not, though.

I'm having that later turbo drain drilled & tapped, so I can make use of it if need be.

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147 mm rods will not work with the 93.2 mm crank. I have an engine disassembled with that crank, and the piston pins are already quite close to the oil ring, and they have 143 mm rods. You could play with fire and get the buttons that are used in some pistons so that the rings have something behind them at the piston pin holes, but I think that is playing with fire, even if your piston supplier says it can be done.

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It certainly can be done, but wear is gonna be an issue. For reference, a piston out of a modern F1 engine, 98mm bore. These guys are putting out north of 300bhp/L with a design life of around 2,000 racing miles between engine changes.

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147 mm rods will not work with the 93.2 mm crank. I have an engine disassembled with that crank, and the piston pins are already quite close to the oil ring, and they have 143 mm rods. You could play with fire and get the buttons that are used in some pistons so that the rings have something behind them at the piston pin holes, but I think that is playing with fire, even if your piston supplier says it can be done.

Yeah I saw a pic that you posted in another thread with the 143 rods and pistons. Looked like there was only 1-2 mm to lowest ring. That was my worry. Sounds like I'm going to stick with 143s then.

It certainly can be done, but wear is gonna be an issue. For reference, a piston out of a modern F1 engine, 98mm bore. These guys are putting out north of 300bhp/L with a design life of around 2,000 racing miles between engine changes.

Hah. Like I'm going to compare any of the stuff that we do with F1. That's probably made out of kryptonite. ;)

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Hah. Like I'm going to compare any of the stuff that we do with F1. That's probably made out of kryptonite. ;)

Getting into a bit of an unrelated tangent here, but "Pistons must be manufactured from an aluminium alloy which is either Al-Si ; Al-Cu ; Al-Mg or Al-Zn based."

The material itself isn't anything special, it's just the design and tolerances they hold that make it work. There's nothing but engineering cost and reliability stopping us here :lol:

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Getting into a bit of an unrelated tangent here, but "Pistons must be manufactured from an aluminium alloy which is either Al-Si ; Al-Cu ; Al-Mg or Al-Zn based."

The material itself isn't anything special, it's just the design and tolerances they hold that make it work. There's nothing but engineering cost and reliability stopping us here :lol:

To add to your list, practicality. ;-)

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Wiseco pistons

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Hoping that the short block will be ready Mon. Rods & Pistons weight matched. Small ends have to be honed for wrist pins, rod clearance in block, carrier oil drain drilled & tapped, main & rod bearing clearances checked, etc.

Assembled the header/turbo/WG/DP to confirm everything fit nicely - it's so purdy :D

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There is no way I can run 147s if your piston already looks like that.

Unless you get the earlier crank....

That looks so god damn sexy ^_^

I have to agree :D - I wish they made clear silicone couplers so I could look at that compressor after it's installed :lol:

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If those are Hussein's pisons for 147 mm rods, and he is using the 90 mm crank, you are right, the 93.2 mm crank will only make the problem even worse.

Consider this, volvo went from 139.5 mm rods to 147 mm rods about '02, and that was with the 90 mm crank, which is what I think Hussein showed in his first picture 90 crank/147 rods. When they went to the 93.2 mm crank, they went to 143 mm rods (also had 21 vs earlier 23 mm piston pins.) 93.2 mm crank is 3.2 mm longer stroke, and the 143 mm rod is 4 mm shorter rod than the 143. Almost, but not quite putting the piston pin bore right at the bottom of the oil ring and in the same relative location to the top of the piston.

And, I think Hussein was showing a 147 mm piston on the left, and a 139.5 mm piston on the right, so you can see the difference in the height of the piston fromt the crown to the rings is almost the same in both pistons, but the 147 mm piston has the piston pin coser to the top of the piston, maybe 7.5 mm closer? So if you used the 147 rod with the 93.2 crank, you'd have to push the piston pin into the are of the 1st or 2nd ring. Or, you have the ring lands much closer to the piston crown. Boosted engines tend to have their rings further down from the top of the piston, from what I've read, to keep them from having the top of the piston collapse into the top ring land from the extra pressure. So probably not wise to move the piston ring too much further up towards the top of the piston. My pistons are at the shop for sizing the bores, but I recall that the rings on the pistons that go with 143 mm rods have the piston rings slightly higer on the piston, but not dramatically so.

Another point, Volvo went to thinner rings with the later engines, don't recall the year, but the 93.2 mm crank pistons definitely have thinner rings, and that allows them to be a bit closer together, thus oil ring is higher in the piston, thus allowing you to get the piston pin just that much higher in the piston, because the rings don't take up as much real estate.

Thanks for the photos Hussein. I'll have to photgraph my pistons from the 93.2 mm crank to show the relative position of the ring lands and the piston pin hole. May take a bit.

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Really lookin forward to seeing what this beast of a turbo can do. Vems plus this Turbo = Happy days. Infact the Turbo/DP ect is so nice its almost a shame to use lol.

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