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What Cylinder Head To Use For Best Performance With 2.3L Block?

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Posted

OK, so this has come up in a bunch of different threads, and I'd like to see if we can concretely define which later heads are the best bang for the buck, and what mods are required in each case in one thread.

related threads: Why Build?

Ultimate Budget Build

What The Inside Of Your Head

Thoughts?

Some questions:

What year did they stop using the 2.3L?

Will 2.4 or 2.5 heads bolt on without issues to oil or water cooling passages?

Which cams/gears should be used to eliminate the VVT?

Do the crank / waterpump/ tensioner gears need to be changed for use of later cams (different belt/teeth configuration?)

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Posted

99-2000

99 2.3 T5  Single VVT

99 2.4 LPT Single VVT

00 2.4 R   Single VVT
2001-2004
2001-2004 2.3   T5   Single VVT

2001-2004 2.4   LPT  Single VVT

2005-2009 2.4   T5   Dual VVT

2003-2009 2.5   LPT  Dual VVT

2004-2009 2.5   S60R Dual VVT

NA VVT cars had VVT on the intake cam instead of the exhaust cam. It may be possible to use the non VVT exhaust cam. someone would have to verify the journals though..

Captain Bondo posted some info about him putting 960 cams into a s80 t6 motor, took a bit of machining but it worked.

when using the 99+ head/block+head you will need to use the accessory rack from the older style 93-98 850/x70 for the easiest swap. it is possible to use the newer style but the only problem would be with the power steering pump as the 99+ use an external PS fluid reservoir. Aaron was able to get the older style PS pump with some bracket modification for htownturbobricks car

IMO the best/cleanest setup (my setup) would be to use a 99+ steering rack along with keeping all the original accessories/accessory rack from the 99+ motor type. you will need to drill out the PS fluid reservoir/water reservoir bracket from the 99+ strut tower and tack, sand and repaint it onto the 850/x70 strut tower. you will also need to port match the 94-98 intake manifold to the 99+ head and use the older style thermostat bracket. using turbo tuner you will not have to put a cap and rotor onto the car as it is going to support coil on plug soon. This whole process completly gets rid of any hoses that are running between the rad/ic and the intake manifold. It is VERY clean look

thanks for opening this thread also :) lets keep it updated with any info we find out.

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Posted

OMG Finally this thread has been started!

Lets get some valuable input guys! This could be a sticky one day!

If we can pick up a later head that flows better than $3 g's worth of machining for under 800$

I would love to know more please everyone share your information!

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Posted

updated my post with a little more info.

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Posted

Here's what I can add.

Latest version R head gasket is MLS (multi layer steel) like a Cometic, this is the stock replacement. I got mine from Victor Reinz.

The cooling ports are different, they are staggered and will provide better cooling. Oil feed and crankcase drain ports are all compatible. If you use a non CVVT head with the MLS gasket you'll have to drill a few ports into the cooling passages in the head to get adequate cooling.

So this means a CVVT head will bolt onto a non CVVT block.

You cannot to my knowledge put a non CVVT cam in place of a cam that was CVVT.

The journals are significantly different, this is true for any potentional non CVVT cam be it earlier 870 style or later P2 style.

Obviously modification could be made to the head but it's not a drop in.

You can run a CVVT system on a car that didn't come equipped with it but you'll need a controller.

To control the CVVT solenoid you only have to vary the duty cycle - on time.

The frequency is fixed at 250 hz.

Acceptable duty cycle ranges from 20% to 95%.

The easiest way to control it is by setting up a 555 timer to trigger a TIP120 power transistor off a boost pressure sensor.

555 fixes the frequency at 250hz and the change in boost pressure (resistance change) will retard/advance the cam as load (boost) is increased.

Basic knowledge of electronics and intercooler is required to implement.

Setting up a proper advance/retard setting depends on mods but for a free flowing engine with aftermarket exhaust, downpipe, intake, intercooler, etc.. added overlap can be beneficial while stock engine will be better off with less overlap.

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Posted

Here's what I can add.

Latest version R head gasket is MLS (multi layer steel) like a Cometic, this is the stock replacement. I got mine from Victor Reinz.

The cooling ports are different, they are staggered and will provide better cooling. Oil feed and crankcase drain ports are all compatible.

So this means a CVVT head will bolt onto a non CVVT block.

You cannot to my knowledge put a non CVVT cam in place of a cam that was CVVT.

The journals are significantly different, this is true for any potentional non CVVT cam be it earlier 870 style or later P2 style.

Obviously modification could be made to the head but it's not a drop in.

You can run a CVVT system on a car that didn't come equipped with it but you'll need a controller.

To control the CVVT solenoid you only have to vary the duty cycle - on time.

The frequency is fixed at 250 hz.

Acceptable duty cycle ranges from 20% to 95%.

The easiest way to control it is by setting up a 555 timer to trigger a TIP120 power transistor off a boost pressure sensor.

555 fixes the frequency at 250hz and the change in boost pressure (resistance change) will retard/advance the cam as load (boost) is increased.

Basic knowledge of electronics and intercooler is required to implement.

Setting up a proper advance/retard setting depends on mods but for a free flowing engine with aftermarket exhaust, downpipe, intake, intercooler, etc.. added overlap can be beneficial while stock engine will be better off with less overlap.

AWESOME INFORMATION LUCKY!

Any more information on what modifications would need to be made maybe HtownBrick will chime in

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Posted

aaron Juan did the work for htowntubrobrick.

updated with more info...

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Posted

Juan did the work for htowntubrobrick.

He wishes :lol:

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He wishes :lol:

who did then? thats what htownturbobrick said.

ahhh nvm it was aaron! ajhehr

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Posted

This might not be of any help, but you did ask :D

This pertains to North American cars.

The 2.3L, as a block, was no longer used after 2005. The Gen. 1 T5's and R's generally lost .1L to the 'standard' motors, and in the P2, that was generally the case as well (except for the 2.5T which had some 'overlap'). As we all know, the 'earlier' T5's and R's were all -.1 except for the '00 VR which kept a 2.4L block.

P2's w/ a turbo were 2.4L's as the 'base' turbo car, which later went to the 2.5T. The 2001-2004 T5's were 2.3L, then in 2005, Volvo actually did some *good* trickle-down engineering and the T5 shared most components w/ the R's motor, but using a 2.4L block. The 05+ P2 T5's and P2 R's share crank, rods, head, cams, etc.

The P2 turbo cars all share the same valves.

Lucky, have you actually implemented a VVT circuit like the one you mentioned (like what you did w/ the 4C setup)? I am looking to do something just like what you describe with a 98 ECM and would love to be able to make the dual VVT (properly) functional.

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Posted

Forwarding thread to Aaron

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Here is a little more info in case some people want to read... just about what they changed

http://www.volvoclub.org.uk/revised_engines.shtml

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Posted

2001-2004 2.3 T5 Single VVT

2001-2004 2.4 LPT Single VVT

2005-2009 2.4 T5 Single VVT

2003-2009 2.5 LPT Dual VVT

2004-2009 2.5 S60R Dual VVT

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Posted

thanks, edited.

so it looks like the 2003 lpt would be a great motor to get!

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Posted

Lucky, have you actually implemented a VVT circuit like the one you mentioned (like what you did w/ the 4C setup)? I am looking to do something just like what you describe with a 98 ECM and would love to be able to make the dual VVT (properly) functional.

Yes but i just used a piggy back system with an additional tuning map for the vvt. So didn't use the 555/tip120/boost sensor method.

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