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BlackT5

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Time to start ordering off the dollar menu again. 

The DSM nerds seem to like it. Leg day everyday.  
s-l500.jpg


Used Ground Control kit. 
The H&R's didn't get rid of the wheel gap. I'm going to need an alignment anyways might as well...right?
Generic pic.
IMG_6044.jpg

Edited by fivex84
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2 hours ago, mattsk8 said:

T3 out of a 2000 S60 w/ 120k miles. Decided since mine had 200k on it, might as well. Paid $600 for the whole thing, going to sell the turbo that came with it.

Any suggestion on what to do before I drop it in? It looks super clean, no oil leaks anywhere. I plan on going through the PCV system, doing plugs and stuff like that obviously and also putting a timing belt and water pump in it before I put it in... but do you guys think I should do valve seals too?

 

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2001 S60?

If you replace the valve stem seals, stick with OEM. Trheyre pricey but worth itAftermarket seals have a high failure rate, oftentimes in under 2 years. It's a pain in the ass to do, but much easier with the motor out. 

I think that is a solid lifter head, so make sure that you keep the shims/lifters matched up to be reinstalled in the same order they came out so you don't have to re-shim the lifters. 

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1 hour ago, andyb5 said:

2001 S60?

Yes, my bad. It's a 2001, and the manufacturing date is 09/00. What's harder about the valve seals once it's in? Kinda wondering if I should just wing it and not do them, just do the timing belt and hope for the best...

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Depends on how far you want to take it, but if you're doing the timing belt and possibly valve seals, replace that rear engine pipe (assuming this one is corroded) . It's cheap insurance, mine had severe rust after just 7 years in NY. 

 

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6 hours ago, mattsk8 said:

Yes, my bad. It's a 2001, and the manufacturing date is 09/00. What's harder about the valve seals once it's in? Kinda wondering if I should just wing it and not do them, just do the timing belt and hope for the best...

You know, I'll play devil's advocate...

I'm all for preventative maintenance.  I'm also all for saving money.  If there is no plan of investing a large amount of money (if you're contemplating whether you want to spend the few hundred dollars to do the valves, assuming you don't have the spring compressor already, you probably aren't), then pull the cover and check the belt.  If it doesn't look like its going to pull the teeth off the next time it moves, then put the engine in and get it running.  Once you're able to confirm it runs well, go back and put the belt on (IMO, this is not a difficult job at all in the car).  

IMO, if you're not pulling the head, the difficulty is not so much greater as to even remark, with the engine in or out.  If you were pulling the head, do it with the engine out.

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7 hours ago, mattsk8 said:

Yes, my bad. It's a 2001, and the manufacturing date is 09/00. What's harder about the valve seals once it's in? Kinda wondering if I should just wing it and not do them, just do the timing belt and hope for the best...

Access to the exhaust side of the valvetrain is tight due to the firewall. I did mine with the head off the car and it was still a pain in the ass :laugh: 

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15 hours ago, mojojo said:

You know, I'll play devil's advocate...

I'm all for preventative maintenance.  I'm also all for saving money.  If there is no plan of investing a large amount of money (if you're contemplating whether you want to spend the few hundred dollars to do the valves, assuming you don't have the spring compressor already, you probably aren't), then pull the cover and check the belt.  If it doesn't look like its going to pull the teeth off the next time it moves, then put the engine in and get it running.  Once you're able to confirm it runs well, go back and put the belt on (IMO, this is not a difficult job at all in the car).  

IMO, if you're not pulling the head, the difficulty is not so much greater as to even remark, with the engine in or out.  If you were pulling the head, do it with the engine out.

Thanks, I like this idea the most. It's not as much about the cash as it is about the PIA to do it. Obviously saving money is awesome, but I've never done the valve seals on one of these before (actually the only valve seals I've ever done were in American V8s with the heads off) so I have no idea what I'm in for there, which also means I need to learn all about it, and that means the potential to screw it up is higher too. I think I'll just throw a belt on it and put a rear main seal in it and call it good. I should get the VIN and carfax it and see if there's a good maintenance history.

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8 hours ago, mattsk8 said:

Thanks, I like this idea the most. It's not as much about the cash as it is about the PIA to do it. Obviously saving money is awesome, but I've never done the valve seals on one of these before (actually the only valve seals I've ever done were in American V8s with the heads off) so I have no idea what I'm in for there, which also means I need to learn all about it, and that means the potential to screw it up is higher too. I think I'll just throw a belt on it and put a rear main seal in it and call it good. I should get the VIN and carfax it and see if there's a good maintenance history.

I haven't ever bought a whiteblock outside of the car before.  However, I've bought many used japanese engines, all from overseas where maintenance history and mileage was most commonly, not available.  There were a few things I would check when eyeing a prospective purchase.

I'd open the filler cap and have a look.  If there's an excessive amount of sludge it suggested possibly a lack of regular maintenance and/or high mileage.

Check the outside sealing areas for leaks.  If you see none - great.  If you see a large leak, that tells you the owner either a) did not know enough to care/check or b) they did not have any inclination to repair (suggesting lack of maintenance again)

Of course if that looked good, I'd finish with a compression and/or leak down check.  

 

The valve guide seals are not extremely difficult.  If you could safely remove and install the engine, I'd say there's a good probability that you're capable of doing the seals.  IMO, the scariest part of that job is the timing belt - getting it installed correctly (which is not much in itself).  Like stated above, the only thing I'd probably do to it before I put it in is the rms.  Regardless, good luck!

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Not volvo related but I picked up a pair of Hillsound Trail Crampon Ultra (not the shoes). I'm hitting a few of the NH 4k' this winter and after doing some last winter without traction support this should help keep me on my feet rather than bouncing down icy rock faces.

41%2BjcRoPIVL.jpg

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Very nice. I have some Hillsound crampons myself but are quite a few years old at this point. They really bring your hiking to another level that changes the experience quite a bit.

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10 minutes ago, Timbo Slice said:

Very nice. I have some Hillsound crampons myself but are quite a few years old at this point. They really bring your hiking to another level that changes the experience quite a bit.

Why? Does daddy's yacht get ice on it...

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