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Matt01

How To Make: Koni Adapter Brackets For Awd Cars. (Must See)

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Hello,

I decided to make myself some koni adapter brackets for my 850 AWD. I found it to be quite easy but it took some time and patience. This way does require them to be having welded.

Background:

I'm a college student, not a mechanic, or a welder, or a lumberjack. Clearly i'm cheap. I did this in my garage with some tools, it is so easy no one should pay upwards of 200$ for them. It took me a day to figure out the first prototype which I will post pictures of after.

There is nothing scientific about this, eye ball and measuring tape is the only science you'll be using.

Measurements:

The hole for the koni shock: 9 /16"

From center to center from the upper bracket holes (where the studs bolt down through the subframe) = 2 holes drilled 3.5" apart.

Total Bracket Length: 4"

Tools Needed ( may not all be necessary)

-Angle Grinder - I used it to grind only, not to cut

-Mini Pneumatic Grinder - I used this to cut, because its so precise and I have a big compressor in my garage. My favorite tool.

-Security Glasses because metal in the eye hurts, Ear Protectors because this much grinding is annoying.

-The shock, the bolts, vice grip, ruler/caliper

I bought 2

writeup001.jpg

Pictures and info:

So this is the second bracket I built, far better than the first prototype/proof of concept.

I went to a local metal supplier and bought 3' of 2" x 2" steel angle bar. It cost me 3$ of metal.

writeup020.jpg

I made my lines for the 4 4" pieces and the 2 holes that are 3.5" apart

writeup021.jpg

writeup022.jpg

When you put them together it looks like this:

writeup023.jpg

But too much space, so the next step is to grind down the inner bar so it sits closer to the koni

writeup024.jpg

after:

writeup025.jpg

Then I made the holes to temporarily bolt the bracket together before welding also I made the holes for the studs.

writeup026.jpg

Then I made the hole for the shock itself, notice the bolt I used for the shock, because the inside of the koni is tapered for some reason, make sure there is almost NO play between the bolt the bracket and the shock, I used 9/16" if I remember correctly. Dont want a rattle..

writeup028.jpg

Nextly I made the lines by eye of what had to be cut out, nothing precision here, it doesnt really matter, but you can't leave it square

writeup031.jpg

Keep going intill it looks like this:

writeup034.jpg

I forgot to photograph the marks I made by eye, but you have to notch out 1 side so that it'll clear the subframe. notch out close to the bolt, but make sure you leave enough metal so the bracket wont break. Grind down everything, round it all out so it won't cut you or hurt you.

writeup035.jpg

Lastly: Have it welded, I brought it to a friend and for 10$ a bracket:

writeup038.jpg

writeup041.jpg

Bolt up the shock and you should be able to install that, if something does not clear after the weld, take your grinder and make the adjustments. I have these brackets on my car and as long as you dont mess up the hole measurements too bad, it'll work. The first one I had to make some adjustments after welding.

I'll add pictures later of it installed on the car. I tell you, going from a blown shock to a Koni Yellow... Well it just feels good. I add my information openly I want to save people money, and I don't want people to wait to get rid of there nivomats. I waited way too long to figure this out.

First Prototype, not pretty, but still works:

writeup016.jpg

I bought some crap galvanized metal from the hardware store, it was thin, my welder didnt like it (something about toxic smoke and contamination) and I felt like I needed to add washers on the sides to make it sturdy enough. But it can be done!

Have a good one!

-Matt

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Nice work!

You did forget to mention to those considering this that they have to get non-nivomat AWD springs....

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not necessarily, I've been using my stock springs for years. It provides a nice drop, however with a less than ideal spring rate. But with the Koni's I can't complain it takes the bumps well and smooth, but the rear has body roll. For daily driving it's usable but don't expect the stiff suspension feeling from the rear with the stock springs.

For that matter, you don't even need to use koni's. I'm just not sure if this would be considered "dropped" for the shocks, seeing how it's not mounted on the proper car. The bottom mount of the shock could be sitting lower or higher than it's supposed to be. But we all know Koni's could handle it if it is lower, other shocks are unknown territory.

Ultimately I'd like to upgrade to the kap racing AWD coil over sleeve. I agree that it would be the best to take full advantage of the Konis.. Im saving up!

This write up is just to save the money of ordering the whole kit which if I remember is over a grand.

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Great work. I was looking at the kaplhenke shock adapters and they really didn't seem that hard to make. Good to know how easy it is.

Nice work!

You did forget to mention to those considering this that they have to get non-nivomat AWD springs....

What other non-nivomat AWD springs are there besides TMEs?

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I see you finally got tired of waiting for that guy on V70R... He was all talk that he could build custom suspension pieces. He wanted $400 for 25mm rear swayabars, yet he couldn't even make up these simple brackets... :glare:

Interesting way to mount the shock in the bracket. So what do you have the Konis set to? And you are using stock Nivo springs? :huh: You should have used your Ohlins springs those can handle the weight of the car without Nivos helping... I'm assuming the ride is awful without the proper springs in it, way too soft and bouncy, you might have just been better off keeping the Nivos in it till you upgrade the springs...

I'd run Bilstien HDs to see if gave you a better ride. They are high pressure gas vs. Koni Sports oil filled shocks. HD control compression vs Konis rebound. Might make the rears less bouncy.

What other non-nivomat AWD springs are there besides TMEs?

AWD TME springs are for Nivos only, they don't make TME springs for the Ohlins setup anymore. The only non Nivo springs are for Ohlins setup or S70 AWD w/o Nivo or go custom, out of those I'd avoid the S70 springs as they probably aren't stiff enough to hold up the extra weigh of a wagon vs. a sedan. Custom springs rate should be around 300-400lbs...

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I bought some crap galvanized metal from the hardware store, it was thin, my welder didnt like it (something about toxic smoke and contamination) and I felt like I needed to add washers on the sides to make it sturdy enough. But it can be done!

Yeah, Galvanization sickness SUCKS. It's like super cold, and it hits very hard. (With MIG welding.. TIG is a little different effects from what I remember)

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The valving on the FWD shocks isn't a good match for the location on the AWD cars as far as I have seen.

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The valving on the FWD shocks isn't a good match for the location on the AWD cars as far as I have seen.

Hey don't you make a really nice, and not terribly over priced piece for this? and it's one milled piece?

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I'm with Neu on the springs - theNivo units are way too soft to provide stabile handling without the Nivo. They were designed that way - very soft as the Nivo governs the ride height.

There are Volvo AWD non- Nivo springs , but it maybe sedan only as Ben mentioned.

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Hey don't you make a really nice, and not terribly over priced piece for this? and it's one milled piece?

kind of, its not for FWD Shocks though...

473765_10150986447242857_196097438_o.jpg

you can see it here.

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I see you finally got tired of waiting for that guy on V70R... He was all talk that he could build custom suspension pieces. He wanted $400 for 25mm rear swayabars, yet he couldn't even make up these simple brackets... :glare:

Interesting way to mount the shock in the bracket. So what do you have the Konis set to? And you are using stock Nivo springs? :huh: You should have used your Ohlins springs those can handle the weight of the car without Nivos helping... I'm assuming the ride is awful without the proper springs in it, way too soft and bouncy, you might have just been better off keeping the Nivos in it till you upgrade the springs...

I'd run Bilstien HDs to see if gave you a better ride. They are high pressure gas vs. Koni Sports oil filled shocks. HD control compression vs Konis rebound. Might make the rears less bouncy.

AWD TME springs are for Nivos only, they don't make TME springs for the Ohlins setup anymore. The only non Nivo springs are for Ohlins setup or S70 AWD w/o Nivo or go custom, out of those I'd avoid the S70 springs as they probably aren't stiff enough to hold up the extra weigh of a wagon vs. a sedan. Custom springs rate should be around 300-400lbs...

Ya, I dont have forever to wait. Besides that I saved money! Koni's set to full, i think. With the stock springs i'm not sure if anyone has tried it, but it's actually not that bad. The Koni's can control the bounce well.

I also have OEM non-nivomat AWD springs for the stock ride height, but im not interested in that at this point.

Here is the prototype mounted, I actually was so confident in my second bracket that I screwed up the mounting holes.. I don't know if someone could move this to the end of the original post.

DSCN1295.jpg

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Hey don't you make a really nice, and not terribly over priced piece for this? and it's one milled piece?
:lol:

There are Volvo AWD non- Nivo springs
Volvo Ohlin springs.

kind of, its not for FWD Shocks though... 473765_10150986447242857_196097438_o.jpg you can see it here.
I'd be curious to see how those shocks stand up over time, with no weather protection on the shafts, all the winter salt and road grime would wear them out PDQ...

With the stock springs i'm not sure if anyone has tried it, but it's actually not that bad. The Koni's can control the bounce well. I also have OEM non-nivomat AWD springs for the stock ride height, but im not interested in that at this point.

The stock AWD springs are only 225lbs, yours are compressing them more then holding anything up with them... And that's why you look lowered, because it's sagging. And have you tried to carry any loads or people in the back of your car? I guarantee you are going to be bottoming out.... :ph34r:

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If you weld on galvanized you need to wire brush/grind off the zinc coating. Otherwise you vaporize the zinc and can give yourself heavy metal poisoning. Even after you get all the coating off you still need to be in a VERY well ventilated area and/or use a respirator. If you get a headache after welding on it then you've done permanent damage to yourself.

That said ... Nice work! I'm sure there will be several people who follow your lead on this.

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