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lpt2001

Auto Transmission Adaptation How To

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So my transmission has had some shift flare lately, not nearly to the extent as when I got the car but it shows up now and then. I've flushed twice, once with seafoam, and the fluid looks fine. I also replaced the B4 Servo Cover, and the first 10 minutes with that it was the smoothest shifting car I've ever felt. So now I'd like to try reseting it for an adaptation, but I really don't want to bring it into the stealership. Is there any way to do this without the vida/dice stuff? If not, what else could I do with vida that would make it worth getting to use more than once. Thanks

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I have had my car for over a year, and just finally realized how much an automatic transmission adaptation helps.

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"Subject:- Adaptation procedure

Model & year:- 2001 S60, V70, V70 XC

Description: This transmission relies on adaptive data to properly adjust the shift pressure. If the adaptation is not complete, it may result in one or more of the following:

• Harsh flare. Engine RPM will increase during a shift. This symptom feel like the transmission has lost drive. It usually happens during the 2-3 shift.
• Harsh down shift. Bumpy down shift when the gas pedal is odd (Zero).
• Harsh Garage shift. Sever bump when engaging forward or reverse from park or neutral.
• Harsh engagement control. After coming to a complete stop in drive, with the foot on the brake, the TCM waits for 2 seconds and then disengages drive to reduce emissions. This disengagement is not usually felt by the driver. If adaptation is not complete, then a “thud” will be felt. A harsh re-engagement will also be felt.

Service. The TCM can sometimes take many miles to fully adapt. If you do not have access to the factory tester or Volvo VADIS, then you might try the following.

1. Drive the car forward in the “D” range at about 5 mph (8kph) and bring to a gentle stop. Repeat this procedure at least 10 times.
2. With the engine at idle and your foot on the brake, shift from “N” to “D”. Wait for about 30 seconds. Release the brake. Repeat this procedure for 10 cycles.

If the above does not cure the fault, you will need to get access to a factory tester to reset the adaptation. Remember though that the TCM is constantly updating so not every shift will be the same."

Not sure if that will work on your car, but I say give it a try!

Really if you want the adaptation reset you have to go to a Volvo tech or the dealership.

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The test is correct but you need to clear the adaptionsfirst for that drive cycle to reset them

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I was under the impression that the transmission is always adapting.

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I was under the impression that the transmission is always adapting.

It should be, but sometimes it needs to be told to forget something.

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