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Hello,

i want too convert my s70 t5 too coil on plug, i have a 960 ecu here, they already have the resistors on the board... converted too ostrich!

when the bin with the modified code comes out too run cop?? please can send me someone!

i think is a good thing too make the volvo better

the original system is more then bad, i am on 580hp now and need something better! the distributor system is so sensitive about knock...

regards Zeno

The COP bin already exists and it was developed by TMM9 but he is not sharing it to the "public". He'll probably come up with a plug and play COP comercial solution, including the bin file.

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Yesterday Piet and I had an interesting discussion by mail.

The result of this discussion is that I am convinced that it is possible using lambda control all over the power range.

So forget all the Wot enrichments, VE MAP modifications e.t.c., let the lambda value do its work.

In fact the lambda value of 1 under normal driving circumstances is determined by the lambda sond it self.

It just switches its state around lambda=1.

Why not make a lambda sond that can change its switching point to 0.8 at high loads?

How? It seems simple. Piet suggested to take a wideband and use a micro-controller to convert this signal to a narrowband.

But with multiple switching points. In its most simple form it has a switching point of lambda=1 under normal driving conditions. And under load a switching point of 0.8.

A more elaborate version could have more switching points.

You do not need to know the exact "current load" to switch from 1 to 0.8.

I think the MAF voltage alone, without the RPM signal, is enough. Lets say i switch lambda mode with a MAF voltage of 2.16V or higher.

If this works, which would be nice, we have a precise lambda control over the whole power range. But there is more.

When cruising a lambda of 1 is on the low side. Good for the environment they say, but bad for fuel economy. Depending on the fuel type you could choose for a lambda of 1.05 or even 1.1.

Using the described approach, this is possible.

The software behind such a thing is quite simple. Make the electronics automotive proof is simple as well as long you know what to do.

Please shoot on this idea. ;)

Edited by razorx
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The concern with that approach is that it is entirely reactive, compared with MAF voltage combined with the other maps, which sees the air coming in and assigns fuel trim accordingly.

By seeing burnt mixture in the exhaust, you are attempting to correct an incorrect mixture after it has happened. Not a big deal at low loads and steadier RPM, but with high loads and accelerating rapidly up the RPM range your resolution to correct fuel trim as you go is likely going to be quite limited.

The best running product will always be very finely adjusted maps as a base point, with as little correction applied as possible...

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It sounds interesting but I have some first questions.

1. How would you modify the bin? It seems you would have to have a lambda target table, right?

2. I do the same point as EricF. Lambda is a feedback system and not an active system so using it to control fuel under load can be erratic. The best would be having a lambda/wideband to do adjustments in order to achive the target AFR (like the lambda does to achieve stoich values).

3. I don't see much need of this because with the logging power we currently have (including AFR), ostrich etc, it's quite easy to modify the VE map and get the target AFR we want.

I think the most useful side idea of this concept may be controlling target AFR under load through lambda/wideband (as refered on 2.)

Sorry if I didn't fully understand your idea and your point. I'm still an open mind anyway!

Edited by S70-R
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@EricF: I think the success of this approach is very dependent on the speed of the feedback loop.

The latter is determined mainly by the speed of the mixture in the engine.I moght be wrong, but i think it happens orders like a tenth of a second.

@S70R: There is no target AFR under normal driving circumstances. The point is having simple and precize lambda control like in more modern management.

In general: The VE map will change in this approach in a pure VE map. At now it is a mixed VE (low load) and AFR (high load) map.

In fact using the VE map as pure VE map addresses the solution to the problem of the reactive approach I suggested a bit.

I think the system will respond fast enough on changes. But please continue shooting. ;)

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@S70R: There is no target AFR under normal driving circumstances. The point is having simple and precize lambda control like in more modern management.

I was talking about target AFR under load. If I understood correctly you would use wideband/lambda to control fueling under load so you would have to have some kind of target AFR map under load.

Or that "target AFR map" would be the VE map actually?

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Within my approach the target AFR will be controlled by an extra microcontroller.

If my theory is right the VE map will become a pure VE map.

Remember this all is pure hypothetical.

I have a single automotive PIC board as leftover of another project.

Maybe I will give it a try after holiday and two distribution replacements and some more work to be done.

In fact I am quit curious. Yuts for fun and understanding.

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I am pretty sure I read somewhere on here that you can change the limits on when the fan kicks in in the binary. I had a look, and I couldn't find it.

Anyone know if this is possible?

My temps get up to 104C (thats the most I have seen I think), and swings at most about 10 degrees (e.g. 92-102C) in a short time. I would like it a little lower. I figured I would try turning the fan on earlier first, see if that helps.

PS: I recently (this year) put an 87 degree Wahler thermostat in. I am currently running Volvo blue coolant 50/50 and have an all aluminium radiator. I had the same temp swings with my OEM radiator.

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I browsed through the DAMOS and added the 5 coolant temp set points for fan turn on to the current .xdf. I posted it a while back.

@Razor

Why are you set on making things so complicated? In my experience, at full load the target VE map, as it is, targets AFR's to with ±.2. Why you want to mess with that?

If you are dead set on it, check out the SLC FREE from 14point7.com. It uses a Cypress PSOC chip which is very versatile chip with the ability to set pin functionality via software. 5 pins are broken out into a header for interfacing. You could use one of these pins as an ADC for the MAF, or better the load output from the ECU (to the auto trans). You could then code the simulated narrowband switch point to correspond to different AFRs based on load. Say idle at 14.7AFR, cruise at 15.6AFR, and then full load at 12.3AFR. Then set the load threshold for lambda control to 12.24ms so that the ECU always remains in closed loop. I think however, this would require re-tuning of the lambda PID factors so that you avoided erratic AFR control at full load.

Edited by Tightmopedman9
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Thanks TMM9, I found your post.

Here is the new .xdf:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hf37ja3bh31bs2d/REV6-Radiator%20Fan%20Control.XDF

It has control for the 5 fan speeds, their coolant switch points, time control and speed control.

The dropbox link is bad. Are you able to update it?

Thanks again,

Clinton

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Yesterday Piet and I had an interesting discussion by mail.

The result of this discussion is that I am convinced that it is possible using lambda control all over the power range.

So forget all the Wot enrichments, VE MAP modifications e.t.c., let the lambda value do its work.

In fact the lambda value of 1 under normal driving circumstances is determined by the lambda sond it self.

It just switches its state around lambda=1.

Why not make a lambda sond that can change its switching point to 0.8 at high loads?

How? It seems simple. Piet suggested to take a wideband and use a micro-controller to convert this signal to a narrowband.

But with multiple switching points. In its most simple form it has a switching point of lambda=1 under normal driving conditions. And under load a switching point of 0.8.

A more elaborate version could have more switching points.

You do not need to know the exact "current load" to switch from 1 to 0.8.

I think the MAF voltage alone, without the RPM signal, is enough. Lets say i switch lambda mode with a MAF voltage of 2.16V or higher.

If this works, which would be nice, we have a precise lambda control over the whole power range. But there is more.

When cruising a lambda of 1 is on the low side. Good for the environment they say, but bad for fuel economy. Depending on the fuel type you could choose for a lambda of 1.05 or even 1.1.

Using the described approach, this is possible.

The software behind such a thing is quite simple. Make the electronics automotive proof is simple as well as long you know what to do.

Please shoot on this idea. ;)

Why mimic the narrowband in stead of using wide band input? Edited by Ramses II
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Thanks TMM9, I found your post.

The dropbox link is bad. Are you able to update it?

Thanks again,

Clinton

Ooops, sorry bout that.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/p3osqx4c1mmvtc6/REV6-Radiator%20Fan%20Control.XDF

Why mimic the narrowband in stead of using wide band input?

Then you would have to code a new routine in the ECU to use the wideband input to control the AFR.

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