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I'm having a hard time interpreting the various fan controls; I'm thinking some may be mislabeled?

I see:

- coolant temps for fan speeds 1-5 (and #5 doesn't make a lot of sense in comparion to the others)

- speed thresholds for speeds 1, 2, & 4 (missing 3? and #4 doesn't make sense in comparison)

- runtimes for speeds 1-3 (speed 3 runtime seems odd)

Is that correct?

Anybody experienced in fiddling with them, and how do the values correlate to actual temp, speed, and time?

here's a screenshot for a visual of what I'm talking about .... untouched values and all parameter windows organized in rows.

fanspeedcontrolscreenshot.png

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Honestly, it doesn't make sense to me either. I just copied it direct from the DAMOS and, well there you go.

I could cross reference it against the 850 NA DAMOS and the 960 DAMOS, but never really felt like it was that important. If I make any adjustments I usually just lower the onset for the fan speed 1 & 2 a bit lower.

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I'm having a hard time interpreting the various fan controls; I'm thinking some may be mislabeled?

I see:

- coolant temps for fan speeds 1-5 (and #5 doesn't make a lot of sense in comparion to the others)

- speed thresholds for speeds 1, 2, & 4 (missing 3? and #4 doesn't make sense in comparison)

- runtimes for speeds 1-3 (speed 3 runtime seems odd)

Is that correct?

Anybody experienced in fiddling with them, and how do the values correlate to actual temp, speed, and time?

Just lower the coolant temp for fan speed values.

I'm running a 160ºF T/stat, and have the fan onset set to keep the coolant temp around 180ºF - lower than that, and the engine never completes warmup cycle which has a 183ºF threshold.

Previously, even with the lower temp t/stat coolant temps would still run at 'normal' operating temp of approx 190ºF, which means the t/stat was simply pegged wide open all the time, except in the winter.

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I browsed through the DAMOS and added the 5 coolant temp set points for fan turn on to the current .xdf. I posted it a while back.

@Razor

Why are you set on making things so complicated? In my experience, at full load the target VE map, as it is, targets AFR's to with ±.2. Why you want to mess with that?

If you are dead set on it, check out the SLC FREE from 14point7.com. It uses a Cypress PSOC chip which is very versatile chip with the ability to set pin functionality via software. 5 pins are broken out into a header for interfacing. You could use one of these pins as an ADC for the MAF, or better the load output from the ECU (to the auto trans). You could then code the simulated narrowband switch point to correspond to different AFRs based on load. Say idle at 14.7AFR, cruise at 15.6AFR, and then full load at 12.3AFR. Then set the load threshold for lambda control to 12.24ms so that the ECU always remains in closed loop. I think however, this would require re-tuning of the lambda PID factors so that you avoided erratic AFR control at full load.

Thanks a lot. I forgot about the load signal to the AT. Better than using the MAF voltage.

There are a couple of reasons why I would like to try my concept of lamda regulation all over the power range.

The engine management will suffer far less from aging of components. But not aging alone. You will get rid of inter related values that complicate things.

So the following items will become less critical

-injector calibration, also when switching fuel between gas and LPG

-VE map simplified, No need to readjust to a different airflow when modifiing the intake hardware

-An aging or badly calibrated MAF will have far less influence

-As well as the battery voltage

-rail pressure

The routines needed on the microcontroler are simple.

Funny, this SLC free resembles my PIC board a lot. Same handy piggybacking of the display unit to the controller unit.

The wideband is already there of course.

Edited by razorx
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I'm not sure I fully understand your question.

More a question about how the closed loop system works.

Is it only looking at the fast drop/rise of the voltage of a narrowband or is t looking at the actual voltage and try's to target say 0,5V.

If the ECU looks at the actual voltage of the lambda it would be logical that it's comparing this voltage to a value in a map or a value somewhere in the software to know how to interpret that value and know what to do. (Inject more fuel if it's lower than 0,5V and inject less fuel if it's higher than 0,5V.)

If you know the place of the value you could change the value to match value of a wideband lambda. Say higher than 2,5V inject less fuel lower than 2,5V inject more fuel.

But maybe I am looking to simple at this.

Edited by Ramses II
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The functioning of our narrowband is really simple.

Consider it a digital output:

-Close to 1V with a mixture richer than lambda 1

-Close to 0V wit a leaner mixture than lambda 1

That is why I will create a simulated narrowband by converting the analogue voltage of a wide band to simple switching points.

This will be a clever simulated narrowband because depending on the load the switching point will change.

If anyone can post specifications of the Tq signal to the AT better than those in Vida, I would be very grateful.

E.g. Load versus frequency curves.

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I am not sure if I am going crazy, or not. :wacko:

It seems like my car is changing between alternative maps on its own... I was calibrating my injectors, and then it got all weird – my new values were no longer doing anything. I found out that the car had somehow changed to an alternative map.

Now, I don’t think I pushed the accelerator pedal. And I believe that even if I had, that would have only screwed up one iteration right (i.e. the car would have forgotten about the selection after reflashing and resetting the ECU) I have never worried about the alternative maps before so didnt really take notice of the lambda light.

I will do some more testing later, but has anyone experienced anything like this before? I think I will set my alternative maps to be a really odd value so that the car wont even run with them on, so I really notice when it happens...

I am using the rev5b p-part 607 bin.

I feel like a fool. :idiot:

I usually test my connection with RealTerm prior to logging, and I have been sending the character ‘1’. I have now figured out that that will turn on alternative map 1…

I was sure that the character 1 wasn’t initially a special character, I don’t actually recall being able to change to the alternative maps using the terminal window…

Anyway, just so everyone else knows, if you use RealTerm make sure your test character is not a special input character. :)

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There are two Load treshold lambda control tables you have to adjust, one in the upper bank and one in the lower bank.

If you forget one then it does'nt work as expected, otherwise it works just as it should.

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Yes.. indeed, you're right... the tables are showing different RPM scales. :blink:

Didn't notice that before ..strange. The ones in the upper bank are not logical.

But I've filled in the same values in both tables, set it at 4 ms and fuel trims do stop at 4 ms.

The difference seems to be in the xdf file In the upper bank the rows are set to "ïnternal, pure" as a label source an din the lower bank the rows are set to "external (manual)"

So probably in the bin the values for the RPM axis are still the same

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