Tuners Rejoice! Free Tuning For M4.4!


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5 minutes ago, Boxman said:

On another note, my System Voltage varies between 4 to 7 volts, hitting the 7 at high RPM. It seems pretty erratic. Anyone know what's up with that?

Did you modify your .bin to change the logging of RAM 5A (ZWNEU) to RAM 36?

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Attention: The first 30 or so pages of this thread are outdated. Please refer to the M4.4 Wikia article where all the relevant information is currently being collated. Before asking any questions p

Why did I have to PM the guy I don't know him just discovered that this guy posted my results up with my registration number After I paid a trader to do work and map my car and I find out he is advisi

Crush it.

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I'm not sure what you're mentioning so I assume I did not - I only change the bin through what TunerPro allows me to do in the Parameter Categories. This is a bin with A/C mod that I acquired from venderbroeck though, so if what you're mentioning provides some benefit or use in another department, it might be?

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10 hours ago, Boxman said:

I'm not sure what you're mentioning so I assume I did not - I only change the bin through what TunerPro allows me to do in the Parameter Categories. This is a bin with A/C mod that I acquired from venderbroeck though, so if what you're mentioning provides some benefit or use in another department, it might be?

In order to be able to log battery voltage just change 5A hex into 36 hex at address 7D92 in the "manual" (608) bin or at address 7E0C in the "automatic" (607) bin.

 

You can do this with tunerpro:

in the XDF: Create new XDF  parameter - Scalar - give it a name; fill in the Address (0x7D92 for a manual or 0x7E0C for an automatic bin);  select hex digits at output type; leave conversion X and Save.

 

Then Edit  your ADX  to be able to see the battery voltgae in your logs:

under Aquisition choose edit definition - Values - change ZWNEU into Battery Voltage (or something like that) , range low: 0 range high 15, conversion X*.07040

 

 

 

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We call the 608 bin a manual bin and a 607 bin an automatic bin.

 

Essentially there's no such thing as a separate manual bin or automatic bin.

Both the 607 and 608 bin have all routines necessary for a manual as well as for an automatic.

Whether the bin will behave as an automatic or as a manual bin depends on the setting of one single bit (flag).

In the 608 bin it's the first bit of the byte at address C8ED  (C8ED.0) and in the 607 bin it's the first bit of the byte at address C8FC  (C8FC.0)

bit not set = automatic;  bit set = manual.

 

C8ED (608 bin) and C8FC (607 bin) aren't used for anything else, so you can just change it's value with a scalar in the XDF into 0 for automatic and 1 for manual.

Edited by Piet
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Okay so my System Voltage is logging properly now, which leaves me with another question regarding injector calibration - what voltage does the ECU use to determine what injector dead time to take from the voltage-dependent table? Is this the same as system voltage?

I ask because I used venderbroeck&piet's calibration program to find my constant and dead time (a fine program I might add - worked perfectly), then just without thinking too much set that dead time in the 12.47v cell as this is what I remember them telling in some post. However my system voltage seems to be 13.2-13.4 across all RPM, so should I have centered around that cell in the table?

Is there any way of distilling from the logs which cell the ECU used during a drive?

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Yes, the ECU uses the system voltage, which you are logging now, for determining which cell to use in the deadtime table.

 

You can use the trace function of tunerpro to see which cell the ECU uses.

 

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Has there been any progress with gaining control of the CVVT, whether through M4.x or standalone controllers?  I've seen Lucky's posts about using a MAP sensor hooked up to a 555 timer and all that stuff and I am planning on going to meet with my circuit theory professor next week to see if he can help me wrap my head around how that works for feeding a signal to the VVT solenoids, so I want to make sure I have the most up to date information before I do that.  I'm planning on using a B5254T2, so I'll have dual VVT to deal with.

Does anyone know how I could get a signal for engine load out of the ECU?  Ideally, I'd like to use load and engine speed to control the VVT (and ditch the MAP sensor) so that the controller will be working off of the same variables that the ECU is using for ignition timing map.

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Im running a dual VVT engine and with the cams tweaked it seems to run fine but i believe Aaron figured out control of VVT using the rear o2 input which is pretty awesome

Edited by Stevo11811
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28 minutes ago, Piet said:

Rear  O2 heater ouput to control the VVT that is, I believe.

 

 

 

its still morning for me, need more coffee.

Piet, been catching up as much as i can since ive been MIA for a long time on here, you have put some hard work in man, thanks

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1 hour ago, Piet said:

Rear  O2 heater ouput to control the VVT that is, I believe.

Yes, it is basic control only, switching power to the cams from the rear O2 pre-heater circuitry based on a load and RPM setpoint with hysteresis. It makes a fairly significant difference in low-end power and the switch point is imperceptible.  

 

9 hours ago, JaredR1 said:

Has there been any progress with gaining control of the CVVT, whether through M4.x or standalone controllers?  I've seen Lucky's posts about using a MAP sensor hooked up to a 555 timer and all that stuff and I am planning on going to meet with my circuit theory professor next week to see if he can help me wrap my head around how that works for feeding a signal to the VVT solenoids, so I want to make sure I have the most up to date information before I do that.  I'm planning on using a B5254T2, so I'll have dual VVT to deal with.

Does anyone know how I could get a signal for engine load out of the ECU?  Ideally, I'd like to use load and engine speed to control the VVT (and ditch the MAP sensor) so that the controller will be working off of the same variables that the ECU is using for ignition timing map.

If you're determined on doing this yourself, your time would be much better spent learning how to code 8051 ASM and implementing a routine in the ECU vs a standalone control solution. 

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8 minutes ago, Tightmopedman9 said:

If you're determined on doing this yourself, your time would be much better spent learning how to code 8051 ASM and implementing a routine in the ECU vs a standalone control solution. 

So the ECU will actually support doing that?  I was under the impression that the consensus is that your controller was as far as we could go with VVT with M4.4 and that we couldn't get full CVVT without going to some sort of standalone system.

18 minutes ago, Tightmopedman9 said:

Yes, it is basic control only, switching power to the cams from the rear O2 pre-heater circuitry based on a load and RPM setpoint with hysteresis. It makes a fairly significant difference in low-end power and the switch point is imperceptible.  

This is going to the exhaust cam, correct?  Are there enough outputs to control the intake, too?

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Just now, JaredR1 said:

So the ECU will actually support doing that?  I was under the impression that the consensus is that your controller was as far as we could go with VVT with M4.4 and that we couldn't get full CVVT without going to some sort of standalone system.

I was only talking about basic control. 

To achieve CVVT control you need a PID control loop with extremely precise timing, code optimization for such a routine I think would be fairly difficult. The control signal to the VVT is a  250Hz square wave. The duty cycle of this signal controls the speed at which the cam advances or retards. In order to target a specific degree you need to accurately measure the cam position relative to the crank and adjust the duty cycle in relation. This requires a multiphase cam wheel, like the ones found on stock VVT ME7 cars.

Assuming you could build the control circuitry the next problem you'd face is where to mount the cam wheel. You can't put one on the intake cam because of the distributor, nor could you put it on the exhaust since you already have a single phase sensor there. Getting rid of the distributor is easy with COP, but you would have to emulate the stock cam sensor wheel.

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