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Tightmopedman9

Tuners Rejoice! Free Tuning For M4.4!

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@ avinitlarge

(quoting failes, once again... I have to say this new site still doesn't funtion properly).

 

You just need the board, since you already have the LSU49 with the spartan 2. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, venderbroeck said:

You can also try to get the 'gauge' version without the sensor or the gauge: http://www.ecotrons.com/products/wideband-controller-alm-gauge/
Then it's in a neat housing with nice plugs etc.
Maybe if you send them a mail they can quote you a price without the sensor.

I emailed them

Hi Paul,

The cost for the ALM-S without gauge and sensor is $130.

Thanks!

Lauren

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Here is my wb log. Both graphs are with a Spartan 1.

The first graph is with a hardware based WB regulation I created.

The second graph is with Piet's WB regulation done by the ECU self.

The hardware based regulation I created earlier runs internally at a very high speed. As stated before: It is the speed and the quality of the WB sond that determines the quality of the feedback system. The ECU is more than fast enough and the PID regulation works well.

It is also nice to see that Piet's ECU based regulation handles load transients far better than the primitive hardware regulation I created before.

Last comment: I drive LPG. I prefer reading values in lambda but for convenience i graphed in AFR. ;)2016060701.jpg

(Spartan 1 hardware WB regulation LPG)

 

2016060702.jpg

(Spartan 1 software WB regulation LPG)

Edited by razorx

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36 minutes ago, Avinitlarge said:

I emailed them

Hi Paul,

 

The cost for the ALM-S without gauge and sensor is $130.

 

Thanks!

 

Lauren

 

 

 

Interesting ... the difference in price between their board kit with and without the LSU49 is 70 dollar........

 

But the difference between the ALM-S with and without the LSU49 all of a sudden is only 39 dollar....

 

Hmmm .....

 

 

Edited by Piet

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Hi,

 

has anybody had the problem with Tunerpro that it doesn't show any lines in the monitors? ADX works on other PC but on my home PC I can't use the monitors.

It just looks like attached.

I re-installed TP, no success. All other PCs of mine work. Same OS etc. Also thought it might have to do with the screen resolution or something and lowered it from 2560x1440 to 1920x1080 with no effect.

 

tunerpro monitors blank.png

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OK guys, help me out here and let's brainstorm a little. I'm having a lot of difficulty getting a good AFR signal into my ECU.

My main issue is that the analog 0-5V signal as detected by the ECU is noisy as monkey, as in a total variance of ~0.4 AFR oscillating at 5-10 Hz. So a lot of noise in a pretty short time.

Initial setup:

  • WB (MTX-L) grounded directly at negative battery terminal
  • Fused+switched 12v input directly from positive battery terminal to gauge
  • Single unshielded wire from one of the analog outputs (0-5V) directly onto the tank pressure channel pin on my ECU.
  • LSU4.2 sensor

What I tried to rid the noise

  • Replaced the single wire by a coaxial cable with the outer shielding grounded at the ECU ground.
  • Connect the WB ground to this coaxial cable as well as the neg battery terminal at the same time
  • Grounded the WB assembly only at the ECU through this coaxial cable (disconnected battery ground)
  • Tried grounding at ECU at 1st try) Pin A42 and 2nd try) Pin A28
  • Tried switching to the Rear O2 channel for logging the wideband to the ECU

Now, none of these things actually reduced the noise of the analog signal. Additionally, switching to the Rear O2 channel gave me this dreaded offset (while it shouldn't when I tried A28, iirc), it was now regulating itself around 14.3 instead of 14.7 as requested at idle (TunerPro says it's regulating 14.7 but my gauge goes between 14.2-14.5).

To check if the signal had good fidelity to begin with, I hooked up the serial port of the MTX-L to my PC to see what signal it actually gives, and that output was smooth as silk. Like, maybe a 0.02-0.04 AFR in noise, a full order of magnitude lower compared to what I'm seeing in TunerPro.

Just for the heck of it I took my multimeter and checked if I could see any AC components around my car, and actually there was a 30v AC component between the positive terminal of the battery and the various grounds around the car. Though I'm not sure if this should have any influence at all on my analog output...

So, if anyone has some ideas on what to try next, I'd very much like to hear them.

Here's a picture of what TunerPro logged in my final try:

zafaEN8.png

 

Edited by Boxman

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i believe my car is having the same issue, my boost sensor logs some pretty odd values, worse at idle, not sure what you are running for ignition but i traced it down to my MSD, next step is switching to COP

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Hm, I'm running stock ignition but how did yours affect your readings exactly, any idea? Unfortunately mine doesn't seem to change with RPM at all.

Edited by Boxman

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3 hours ago, Boxman said:

Just for the heck of it I took my multimeter and checked if I could see any AC components around my car, and actually there was a 30v AC component between the positive terminal of the battery and the various grounds around the car. Though I'm not sure if this should have any influence at all on my analog output...

So, if anyone has some ideas on what to try next, I'd very much like to hear them.

 

 

I assume you're measuring 30V AC at the battery with the engine running. You should have less than 1 V AC ripple if I remember right. Take the drive belt off the alternator and recheck. May have a bad diode. The battery acts as a large capacitor and smooths out most normal alternator ripple.

Rod

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Hm alright that'd be a good indicator. That was with the engine running, yeah. I guess you mean i should try without the drive belt altogether, right, as i don't see how i  could bypass just the alternator.

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14 hours ago, Boxman said:

Hm alright that'd be a good indicator. That was with the engine running, yeah. I guess you mean i should try without the drive belt altogether, right, as i don't see how i  could bypass just the alternator.

Correct. Just pop the belt off and retest.

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My multimeter was shot, oscilloscope gave a 50-100mV AC component only, so that seems OK.

But it's fixed anyway!

Perks of having good Uni friends, one graduated electrical engineer has a digital oscilloscope at home so we went and measured the hell out of it. The Analog Output of the MTX-L apparently has a (pretty clean) 250Hz block wave. We suspect some PWM somewhere, possibly for the sonde, anyway I'm not sure. Doesn't really matter either, bottom line is it was coming from the gauge and gauge only - the 12v input showed nothing. The 250Hz component was also there with the engine off (thus no alternator) and the gauge running.

So he quickly drew up a very simple scheme (one resistor and capacitor) tuned for the 250Hz block wave while allowing the fast response of the gauge itself, and this is the result. What you're seeing is a short log with the filter in place, then briefly with the GND of the filter disconnected, and then connected again. The picture speaks volumes, and I'm a very happy driver today.

ZCGbNmq.png

 

You can see how the STFT was flipping out over it as well, so this is a major improvement IMO.

Edited by Boxman

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@Boxman: yeah there's really nothing worse than a single un-shielded analog signal wire running around a very noisy electrical environment; it's basically an antennae!  Kind of surprised the coax shielding didn't help though, at least some, but shielding is somewhat of black art.

That's why I mentioned in previous post, wondering why they didn't bring out the signal ground wires from the sensor controller, as they do on the AEM and other controllers.  To save money I suppose.  I ran my sensor ground (sensor-minus) and signal wire (sensor-plus) as a twisted pair from the gauge (in the cab) to ecu box and connected sensor-minus wire(s) to A18 (don't use A19!  This will give you an offset) and B28 respectively (for two analog inputs for boost and WB).  Note these pins are labeled as sensor ground.  Others have simply ran their sensor-minus gauge wires to one of the pwr ground pins on the ecu (e.g. A13, A28, etc.) and haven't had any issues, but I would think that will be a bit electrically noisier.

I think what your friend built and installed is a passive low-pass filter; my guess it's tuned to allow say 100Hz or less, maybe even lower.  At best the response time of the WB is on the order of 10Hz or so; i.e. not fast.  The mystery still is where is the 250Hz coming from?  Whatever it is, it must be electrically close to where you ran your signal wire..  :blink:

Anyway happy tuning!  Keep us posted on how you make out..

Edited by gdog

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On 6/7/2016 at 1:10 AM, Piet said:

The response time of the wideband is very important for a good wb regulation.

I myself have the Sparftan 1 which is reasonably good. But I would strongly advise against the Spartan 2 because mostly they perform really bad.

It's a  hit or miss with these things, Avinitlarge was at luck with one that performs reasonably well.

The best results we have seen were with the very fast and reliable ALM controller.

The WB regulation is a feed back system, that means that there will be always some oscillation around the requested AFR, the amplitude of which depends strongly on how fast the controller is.

 

Thanks Piet!  I didn't know about these guys; I would go that way next time..

http://www.ecotrons.com/products/accurate_lambda_meter/

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