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lookforjoe

Shelby Gt500 Hood Scoop Ar3Z-16C630-Aa Template

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I'm not here to argue man, just simply correcting you because I want the right information to be displayed. The picture Josh posted is actually spot on to what I found.

Which is what you would expect from one of the few guys on this forum who actually races Volvos.

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Put your redneck hat on and think of those giant cowl induction hoods for muscle/pony cars and where the air comes from.

I was considering placing the vent more in the same area the GT500 has it, but don't know if a) it will collide with oily bits, and B) if it will do something completely unforseen with airflow.

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BonnetPressures.jpg

Actually the highest pressure is on the front grille, bumper, headlights, etc area...

I guess I should throw away my engineering degree then and relearn how to run CFD on SolidWorks :rolleyes:

I'm not here to argue man, just simply correcting you because I want the right information to be displayed. The picture Josh posted is actually spot on to what I found.

Edit: And oh by the way, what Crispinds posted is a VW GTI and a Corvette. You can't honestly expect it to be exactly the same for our bricks..

So, at 90km/h, the highest under hood pressure (on an S60) is at the very front of the hood, then next right where the vents are placed (rear of hood, sides of center hood ridge) on my install.

Put your redneck hat on and think of those giant cowl induction hoods for muscle/pony cars and where the air comes from.

I was considering placing the vent more in the same area the GT500 has it, but don't know if a) it will collide with oily bits, and B) if it will do something completely unforseen with airflow.

Those are also RWD, with the engine running longitudinally, not transverse - with exhaust headers on both sides of the bay.

It would be great if someone installed the vent in the front of the hood (on top of the front valance - where the main hood support structure is located - see pic below) - personally I believe it will look like ASS. :lol:

IMG_2676_zps70109efe.jpg

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I guess I should throw away my engineering degree then and relearn how to run CFD on SolidWorks :rolleyes:

I'm not here to argue man, just simply correcting you because I want the right information to be displayed. The picture Josh posted is actually spot on to what I found.

Edit: And oh by the way, what Crispinds posted is a VW GTI and a Corvette. You can't honestly expect it to be exactly the same for our bricks..

Wait, do you mean the one Josh posted with the highest pressure area exactly where I said it was? In front of the bumper? The only place in the picture where you see +1.0? le gasp.

Or the one Crispinds posted with the S80? I'm pretty sure it's a Volvo, not a VW or Vette. And I'm also pretty sure it's more areodynamic than our old bricks, not less.

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Wait, do you mean the one Josh posted with the highest pressure area exactly where I said it was? In front of the bumper? The only place in the picture where you see +1.0? le gasp.

The under hood pressure is what we are focused on, and/or the differential - the under hood pressure is higher (+.2 - +.3) where my cowl vent is located, so how do you reckon that will draw air in, given the pressure outside is lower (-.18)? Pressure will flow from higher to lower area to equalize, as far as I can see.

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The under hood pressure is what we are focused on, and/or the differential - the under hood pressure is higher (+.2 - +.3) where my cowl vent is located, so how do you reckon that will draw air in, given the pressure outside is lower (-.18)? Pressure will flow from higher to lower area to equalize, as far as I can see.

I'm on your side man, I don't think it'll draw air in, because of the massive amount of air being rammed in through the front grilles that has to go somewhere. You're just giving it a path to escape that isn't down under the car. Should help downforce a little, because you won't have quite so much air driving down at the firewall.

Even if there's a low pressure zone under the hood without the vent in modeling that's irrelevant because that's what you'd expect. Air takes the path of least resistance and a solid hood is effectively infinite resistance. So the air has to go down under the car, creating a small amount of vacuum pressure in that area. That doesn't mean that if there's a vent there the air would flow the same way. It's herp derpy to think that. It's like thinking that because an electrical circuit with the switch off isn't flowing current, it wouldn't flow current if the switch was on.

That said, the engine is between your vent and the grilles... I personally would have put it over the open space between the rad sandwich and the cylinder head.

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Wait, do you mean the one Josh posted with the highest pressure area exactly where I said it was? In front of the bumper? The only place in the picture where you see +1.0? le gasp.

Or the one Crispinds posted with the S80? I'm pretty sure it's a Volvo, not a VW or Vette. And I'm also pretty sure it's more areodynamic than our old bricks, not less.

So if the highest pressure is in front of the bumper, what are you gunna do..somehow secure it 2 inches extended off the front bumper? :lol:

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So if the highest pressure is in front of the bumper, what are you gunna do..somehow secure it 2 inches extended off the front bumper? :lol:

Hmmm, maybe that's what the Bosozoku guys are after? ;)

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So if the highest pressure is in front of the bumper, what are you gunna do..somehow secure it 2 inches extended off the front bumper? :lol:

Um... no? That doesn't make any sense and wasn't what I was saying at all. My whole point is that CFD modeling of a vehicle without the vent (and probably without the internals of the engine bay) is absolutely worthless information and completely irrelevant to this discussion. The only way a CFD model would be remotely useful is if you had one fully modeled with the internals of the engine bay both with and without the vent to compare side by side.

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Our engine bays are designed for air coming over the top of the motors to drop down the firewall and exit under the car. I personally put more stock in the Volvo engineers than volvospeeders (no offense). Most high performance vehicles use a similarly designed setup at the FRONT of their hoods and this is not done for cosmetics. I like how the location looks but it's probably not the most benificial setup. If your concern is heat than I suggest you run some temp probes during a regular daily commute and then run them again under the same circumstances with the scoop. That said, when I experimented with under hood temps I saw that at >20mph the difference between average under hood temp and ambient was negligable. Therefor, the only benefit would be the cooling of certain componants (if that's even needed). If it's not a track beast it's only going to be a cosmetic mod so what's the difference?

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yea i did it for cosmetics i think it looks cool and actually looks like something that would come stock on the car well stockish

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Our engine bays are designed for air coming over the top of the motors to drop down the firewall and exit under the car. I personally put more stock in the Volvo engineers than volvospeeders (no offense). Most high performance vehicles use a similarly designed setup at the FRONT of their hoods and this is not done for cosmetics. I like how the location looks but it's probably not the most benificial setup. If your concern is heat than I suggest you run some temp probes during a regular daily commute and then run them again under the same circumstances with the scoop. That said, when I experimented with under hood temps I saw that at >20mph the difference between average under hood temp and ambient was negligable. Therefor, the only benefit would be the cooling of certain componants (if that's even needed). If it's not a track beast it's only going to be a cosmetic mod so what's the difference?

All valid points. However, in my case, the main concern is to avoid heatsoak from the header/turbo at idle/low speed, especially after hard pulls, given the modified setup I have. Volvo engineers had no design plans for these cars that exceeded stock performance and hardware installations. l know for a fact that the scoop provides significant venting under exactly the conditions I need it for, so I'm happy. We can argue all day long about other benefits or potential negatives, it matters not to me.

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Understood, but is it worth the possible negative effects during higher speeds? Also, have you played with titanium header and turbo wraps yet? The stuff is impressive.

Also, I'm not criticizing your setup. I'm mostly pointing these things out for the average VSer who's looking to add the scoop to their stock+tune+catback car.

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Understood, but is it worth the possible negative effects during higher speeds? Also, have you played with titanium header and turbo wraps yet? The stuff is impressive.

Also, I'm not criticizing your setup. I'm mostly pointing these things out for the average VSer who's looking to add the scoop to their stock+tune+catback car.

What possible negative side effects? Higher engine temps? Higher EGT's? Neither are evident in the logged pulls I have done since the installation.

Admittedly, I only went up to about 140mph here, but I'm not going to be driving that way on a routine basis - and coolant temps rose less over the length of the pull here than with pre vent logs

4thJuly25data_zps06618b8e-1.png

I don't believe there are any negative effects to be found.

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