Trunk Shock Snapped Off At Body -- Literally


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This is rather unusual. Not sure if anyone has had this happen before.

The support plate for the trunk shock snapped clean off from the sheet metal (behind the seat bolster).

What would you do to fix this? Welding is likely out of the question since you cannot get to it the area where it attaches. I can add metal to the piece that broke off and then after drilling a few holes, use rivets to secure it to the place it broke off from.

Alternatively, can I use some kind of epoxy? I've read online that Belzona products are good. Also Devcon Liquid Steel gets a lot of recommendations. Another one I'm seeing a lot of is 3M's DP405 which anecdotally is used by Audi for structural repairs.

See photo below:

IMG_0662.JPG%20%282%29.JPG

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A good mom and pop shop can make it happen with welding it. Pull everything out in the surrounding area and pay them $50-$100 to do it. You may have some sort of bizarre bracketry there afterward but that's the price of owning an old car.

Thought about that, but my concern is that I don't believe you can even get to that area. This lead me thinking about epoxies. It's structural, but not life-threatening if it fails (other side still holds, and I know personally how much a trunk hurts when it smashes down on you).

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Go buy a stick of PC Metal at Ace Hardware and make it happen. Since I don't know exactly where the area is, you might have to spend another $10 for some c-clamps to hold it in place while it sets. That stuff is solid.

Shit like this sucks. One of my shock mounts last year sheared a bolt, I didn't realize it until part of the shock tower got taken out. $85 to fab and weld a ring in it's place.

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Go buy a stick of PC Metal at Ace Hardware and make it happen. Since I don't know exactly where the area is, you might have to spend another $10 for some c-clamps to hold it in place while it sets. That stuff is solid.

Shit like this sucks. One of my shock mounts last year sheared a bolt, I didn't realize it until part of the shock tower got taken out. $85 to fab and weld a ring in it's place.

Do you know how PC Metal compares to the other consumer-level epoxies (JB Weld, for instance)?

I know the epoxy is going to only be as good as the surface it is adhering to, which means proper prep is paramount. Since this bracket/hanger has space in the middle, I may also run a flat piece of steel through it so that there is additional surface to bind to.

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Look into panel adhesive. Two part epoxy that will be far stronger than the stick type of epoxy. The only caution is that you will need to pay attention to application temperatures. They work quite well.

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Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I'll call the local body shop supply store (they sell to local body shops) and see what adhesive they recommend. Looking at the piece I need to glue, there is also going to be a mating surface directly under it which will give even more surface area. Since modern cars are put together using adhesives instead of welds, I can only assume it would hold.

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If you do a little Google research you can find videos showing the metal tearing before the epoxy lets go. Should hold for your application without any trouble.

I can imagine so! Most auto manufacturers are now using glue in lieu of welds. Will see what I can find.

Thank you all.

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Are you serious? That's crazy....

I used the stuff when repairing an old Mercedes. There were areas that I couldn't weld, so I glued it. I can't, for the life of me, remember the name of the epoxy, but it comes in a tube with a mixing tip and hardens like steel. I have rebuilt a couple boats, and the epoxy used in them would probably work too, and might be cheaper. The only thing I would suggest is trying to prep the metal as much as possible and make sure it is clean so the stuff can bond.

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Are you serious? That's crazy....

Yep. I believe BMW was one of the first to start doing that in the early 2000s. They say it is lighter and stronger. Instead of a few spot welds where there are failure points, you have an entire seam that is chemically bonded.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/super-glues-are-the-secret-to-making-cars-lighter-1410196062

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I used the stuff when repairing an old Mercedes. There were areas that I couldn't weld, so I glued it. I can't, for the life of me, remember the name of the epoxy, but it comes in a tube with a mixing tip and hardens like steel. I have rebuilt a couple boats, and the epoxy used in them would probably work too, and might be cheaper. The only thing I would suggest is trying to prep the metal as much as possible and make sure it is clean so the stuff can bond.

That's my plan. Lots of prep to make sure the surface is roughed up and clean.

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Look into panel adhesive. Two part epoxy that will be far stronger than the stick type of epoxy. The only caution is that you will need to pay attention to application temperatures. They work quite well.

Looked into a few products.

3M 08115 panel adhesive looks to be very good. $38 for 200ml + $60 for a dispenser.

3M DP405 and DP420 adhesive claim to be commercial grade only. $25 for 37ml + $70 for a dispenser.

I assume both will give me about the same amount of holding strength, likely more than I need for this.

Update:

Bought this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/150765554975 -- should get it next week and will hopefully get it repaired.

Using a mirror, I took a photo of the location where the mount snapped off from. Other than this opening at the bottom and the small opening that the shock goes through, there is no access to it. Glue appears to be the best option.

IMG_0667.JPG

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