Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

howardc64

A Thin Film Of Anti Seize On The Hub When Installing Rotors?

Recommended Posts

When I changed the front rotors on my V70, I had to bang it a few times to get it off due to the rust that has formed between the rotor and hub face. The hammer pits the rotor face where it is struck so I presume the rotor is no good after that. If there is any reason to remove and reinstall the same rotor, this seems problematic.

When I change the front rotors on my 535i recently, the rotors came right off because a thin coat of anti seize was applied.

Is there any reason this wouldn't be a good idea on the Volvo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I changed the front rotors on my V70, I had to bang it a few times to get it off due to the rust that has formed between the rotor and hub face. The hammer pits the rotor face where it is struck so I presume the rotor is no good after that. If there is any reason to remove and reinstall the same rotor, this seems problematic.

When I change the front rotors on my 535i recently, the rotors came right off because a thin coat of anti seize was applied.

Is there any reason this wouldn't be a good idea on the Volvo?

i just got some PB blaster and a wire brush, cleaned the hub. there is anti corrosion crap you can buy too, but I heard the PB blaster on there, even though it's runny, will inhibit rust formation. it may also help to use it when trying to remove the rotor.

with that pit, see if you can get the rotor turned to even it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know lesson learned, but never hit your rotors with a hammer unless they're trashed and you're tossing them. Use a rubber mallet or a block or wood with a regular hammer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a thin coat of anti-seize on my rotors when I installed them. I had to use a gear puller and a hammer to get the originals off.

When I had a Porsche and had to do brake work often due to track use, I also used anti-seize and never had any problems with it. Just make sure that you do not put on so much that it runs and gets on your brake surface.

Also, I never reuse rotors. If they are worn, get new ones. Rotor mass helps dissapate heat and decreases the chance of brake fade and rotor warping. Don't skrimp on brake parts - they may save your life one day. One session on a track and you will understand what I mean.

Also, if you are changing pads, when you push the pistons back then expell the fluid thru the bleeders. The fluid in that area gets real nasty and you do not want to push it back into the system - it can contibute to brake fade and it may contain contimantes that reduce the effectiveness of the system. Think about it - the fluid in the caliper is the fluid that gets the hottest the fastest and is the first to break-down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used a thin film of anti-seize between the hub and rotors for years. No problems and the rotors always come right off next time. I also always use anti-seize on my wheel lugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, if you are changing pads, when you push the pistons back then expell the fluid thru the bleeders. The fluid in that area gets real nasty and you do not want to push it back into the system - it can contibute to brake fade and it may contain contimantes that reduce the effectiveness of the system. Think about it - the fluid in the caliper is the fluid that gets the hottest the fastest and is the first to break-down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know lesson learned, but never hit your rotors with a hammer unless they're trashed and you're tossing them. Use a rubber mallet or a block or wood with a regular hammer.

That part is crucial. If you're using a regular hammer, those rotors better be replaced. If you're re-using the rotors, use a rubber one please!

Also, if you are changing pads, when you push the pistons back then expell the fluid thru the bleeders. The fluid in that area gets real nasty and you do not want to push it back into the system - it can contibute to brake fade and it may contain contimantes that reduce the effectiveness of the system. Think about it - the fluid in the caliper is the fluid that gets the hottest the fastest and is the first to break-down.

pls explain a bit more here......so, just before you push pistons back, you crack open the bleeder ? when do you close it ?

Don't crack your bleeder open when you're compressing the pistons. Just push it back far enough to slide the pads in and put the retaining pins/spring back. If you're anal about changing that fluid out, bleed your brakes properly after, and only after, re-installing the pads, springs and pins. I don't see it necessary to flush them out unless you haven't bled your brakes in a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The theory behind cracking open the bleeder when you compress the piston, is that you don't want to push the old fluid backwards through the ABS unit when you compress the piston. I personally subscribe to cracking open the bleeder, but I've done it both ways over the years with no evil results. I guess it depends on how old the brake fluid is. I just did a brake job on my daughter's 93 Explorer and the brake fluid that came out was really black and nasty. I wouldn't have wanted to push any of that back through the system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.