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  1. Hello VS, it has been a while.
    10 points
  2. Did some things recently: JRZ suspension - Took the R manifold off and put on a ported Japanifold - took the 20t off and cleaned up some shitty threads - Got rid of the BOV and cold side pipin did Forge Wastegate and Forge CBV - Replaced everything possible in rear suspension (not fun lol) - 17" pegs powdercoated with 215 45 continental extreme contact sports 5mm spacer in front 20mm in rear - had a real alignment from a local shop that actually tracks cars instead of a 'tuner shop' lol - had a custom center midship brace made to clear a full 3" dual exhaust that is purchased/designed just not welded yet. I am VERY happy with how the suspension sits/rides/quality. I think new, sticky tires with more sidewall helps too. I miss the eye pop of 18's and now think I will get 18" pegs to have too. Got a bunch of parts at a local shop for paint (including my rear spoiler for you haters) and got a carbon fiber rear spoiler so that I can now find carbon fiber mirror covers and front lip! coming up on 112k! Drove it 300 miles in a year - going to change that as this is my only car for now!
    8 points
  3. 8 points
  4. Drove the car to Colombus, Ohio & back this summer. Fiat gathering out there. Car ran very well, but.... the header I made leaks at the flange, and it is a significant restriction in terms of performance. I found a PLM header for the K24 - so I'm in the process of making that fit bought 2" SS mandrel bends to fix it had to remove the cross support to do this - I'll make a new section when it's all done runners rerouted for the Fiat chassis Slip joint sections cut from original header & reinstalled reworked 2-1 collectors to fit mostly welded Cat is going to go under Muffler on top notched & rewelded the crossmember where I needed clearance for the collector
    8 points
  5. The ID of the adapter is ~70mm
    7 points
  6. Last night: got everything back together and took it for a quick drive.
    7 points
  7. Howdy, The Swede, from Sweden, is back after many years away from the Volvo scene, when I join you guys in 2005 I was driving and modding a 98 V70R AWD (pics here: https://awdturbo.net/1998-v70r-awd/ ). Sold it in 2011 and went on to other brands. Anyway, I'm back in the Volvo now making something that never was intended from Volvo. Not even a concept car was produced of the 460 with awd or a turbo engine, never been sold in the states so google it and you seen what it is and what it look like. This car will be inspected and legal to drive on the roads after it finished, I do have to get it inspected with the factory LPT @ 193 hp but after that it's another story hehehe. So I bought a rust bucket 1997 Volvo 850 STW with the LPT 193 hp 5-cyl turbo, 5-spd and AWD, the timing belt was broken so I expect some bent valves. Paid $80 for it, first I was going to make it a BTCC copy car but changed my mind when I found all the rust in floor and rocker panels. So I was thinking, what vehicle can I put this drive train in?? Then it hit me, the Volvo 460 has never ever been modified by anyone. The 440/460 has never been a popular model here in Sweden or the rest of the world as what I know. There are literally nothing to buy to these cars in the aftermarket scene, no led light no spoilers nothing. So because I'm not like everybody else I wanted to greate a car that ppl would laugh at and pointing fingers saying: Look at that moron that modified an Volvo 460, (fwd and 110hp), and then I break loose all 4 tires at the stop light. The ultimate sleeper is what I want. So I found a 1994 Volvo 460 next door with only 86K miles on it for 35 bucks, it ran perfectly but rocker panel were rusted bad. Stripped the 850 and kept the front clip and rear subframes and the whole drive line, now I'm in the process of matching it on the 460 body. And it's not an easy job I'll tell you. Anyway, if some of you are interested in the process I'm putting all of it on YT. Sorry to say the videos are in Swedish but if I get enough subscribers from the states I'll start making the videos in English. Link in my signature. Also check out Swedes Garage on Instagram (English), pictures come before videos. Thanks anyway, cheers from Sweden 😉
    7 points
  8. Is this a scenario where to get him to appear I need to build a pyre of burning Saab parts and declare the words Fudge Brownie 3 times while spinning around like a dervish? His 50th birthday is coming up on Jan 15th maybe he needs a visit from the ghosts of Volvospeed past? I believe their names are: R Bumper, Pegs, and HIDz
    7 points
  9. Got some new wheels for the whip… 17x7.5” Bridgestone Prodrive GC07-C, 5x108, et38, clear my front and rear BBKs without spacers! 16.4 pounds each. These are forged monoblock wheels, made by Rays Japan.
    7 points
  10. The car is at least back on the ground. The nights out there have been largely broken up with the headlight side gig so work has been slow. What’s left is finishing rewiring the sub and the new amp wiring inside and then I can put the interior back together. The engine needs the intake, couple fender liner panels, brake line bracket and gauge wiring. The R has been super reliable all winter. But ready for some more work. And of course some of the headlights I’ve done. These are full retrofit assemblies that I put together.
    6 points
  11. Thank you! My next project is a 740 wagon, I'm turning it into a pickup The cab will look something like this: some sketches
    6 points
  12. Made it to the Dyno today with a few other Volvo guys. High level parts list: B5234T9 K24 japanifold Green Injectors N/A Intake + TB IPD Turbo back do88 intercooler Vast tune (COP and dual VVT) It's hard to find good info on these cars anymore. I'm very happy with the project, but curious if there's anything to be done with smoothing out the power band. Anyone know the consensus on the N intake manifold vs the RN manifold?
    6 points
  13. I picked up this 07 V8 sport right before the close of the year.
    6 points
  14. Bought this today. Overall it’s in exceptional shape with only 68k miles on it which is crazy for a 98 these days and it was fully optioned when ordered. Most amazing is the window switches are original and clean as the day they were installed. Single owner car well maintained by the best Volvo Indies in the area. But the paint’s a mess in several places because the owner’s husband decided to try to paint over scratches with a small paint brush. I didn’t really want red but it wasn’t that important. Bumpers and hood need to be resprayed and there are decent sized dents in the rear corners below the tail lights - is it possible to hammer those out? Also need to remove the stupid dealer pinstripes and aged door edge protectors. Never owned a Volvo with single stage paint - what am I in for to keep it glossy and not faded? I don’t want to have to wax this thing every few weeks. Steering wheel leather needs to be sorted or probably just order a Redline wrap - they’re still doing good work right? Need a new auto trans lever boot also. Front seats need some treatment - may replace the skin of the drivers side. Rear driver’s door card insert has busted out and needs to be pulled and reupholstered. Nobody out there has Oak R door cards by any chance? Needs a new antenna and new spring seats / strut mounts.
    6 points
  15. I'm getting close to wrapping up some long awaited mods. At a high level, the interior was gutted to recover the headliner, fix the broken dash mounts, and a thorough cleaning. Parts added: DVS 320mm front brakes Stainless brake lines - new steel lines on the rear as well KW V3s control arms end links strut mounts rear spring seats delta links trailing arm bushings replaced sunroof glass, removed sunroof assy to clean and lubricate ...and probably something else in there. I'm really excited about these seat bottoms that I recently found in a junk yard. I speculate that this car has ~300k miles on it... and the last seat bottom (and seat back) really showed it. I'll drive the car for a few more weeks as I wait on some more parts for the new engine/turbo/etc... Parts that are already here: B5234T9 - I've stripped it to the rotating assembly for cleaning and inspection; it gets all new parts going back together dual VVT cylinder head that I've ported myself - 😐 Japanifold N/A intake manifold w/ throttle body/960 plate K24 do88 intercooler/rip kit do88 radiator vast ecu new R bumper and R spoiler that needs to be painted The shop is a mess - I've got a dumpster outside for purging a lot of the stuff that's accumulated over the last few years.
    6 points
  16. Excellent man! It's good to see these X5's are getting the love they finally deserve. Especially the M54 engines, they really are great motors. I do miss the classic Volvo scene, but damn do I love this S90. I just put my BBS wheels on a few days ago, I swear you can feel the weight being lifted off of the car compared to the Cratus wheels, which are like 8 lbs heavier per wheel. Pic below:
    6 points
  17. Lots more changes happened this past month. I installed a clutch slipper which will allow me to dial in the launches and basically just hit the 2 step and then side step the clutch pedal. 99+ P80 clutch master cylinder which has a position sensor that I will use to control flat foot shift. I added a flex fuel sensor and at the same time thought it would be a good idea to redo the fuel lines in black and switch from rubber to PTFE. I also converted everything over to black silicone and all vac lines to -3AN and -4AN. Lastly I built a new intake to practice my aluminum welding and make the bay a bit more presentable. It also fixed a bunch of rubbing issues with the intake. Lastly I threw it on the dyno to clean up the tune a bit. It made some serious power @ 30 psi. 818awhp/595awtq.
    6 points
  18. For a long time I've wanted to swap in a FWD subframe to use 2-bolt control arms. The drivers side 4-bolt arm is really challenging to access because of the M66 case. Several years ago I parted out a 99 V70 NA, and kept the subframe for this project. I was finally able to get started on the project this winter. Using a FWD subframe on an AWD car requires welding the AWD transmission mount bracket onto the subframe. I made a template to locate the bracket on the FWD subframe, then cut the bracket off from an AWD subframe taken from a XC my friend parted out: Once I had the bracket in place, I had to notch the bracket to fit around the control arm bracket, then drilled the holes in the subframe to allow for full engagement of the transmission mount bolts: Then once everything was properly prepped and ready for welding, the bracket and subframe around the bracket were ground clean to remove the factory protective coating and 20 years of road grime. Then I had a friend weld the bracket in place. I think he did a fantastic job given the questionable cleanliness of the material he was working with: I cut off some of the extraneous brackets and cleaned everything up to make it easier to work in/around. Then I had a friend powdercoat the subframe to keep everything protected and looking good for years to come. They blasted the subframe clean, then applied a zinc primer, the color powder, and gloss clear powder. Everything came out looking fantastic. I picked a grey powder with some metallic flake to it: After being powdercoated, it was time to install a set of BNE Dynamics (Kaplhenke Racing) delrin subframe bushings. I made a tool to install the bushings - one 3/4" bolt, a 3/4" nut, a three 3/4" fender washers, a 4" metal octagonal junction box, and two j-box covers. Punch the knockouts out of the j-box and cover plates, then place the j-box above the bushing with one fender washer, drop the threaded bolt through the bushing, then two fender washers and j-box covers, and the nut. Tighten the nut to drive the bushing into the subframe. I used my M12 stubby impact and it made life nice and easy. The cardboard is used to protect the powdercoat. And the results - the bushings were seated perfectly, and no marks were left in the powder coat: And with all four bushings installed, the custom subframe is ready for install: Then I prepped a set of 93 850 aluminum control arms for install. I picked up 4 or 6 sets a few years back, sold most of them, and kept a pair for myself. I got a set of new ball joints, then torqued the bolts to spec (13 ft. lbs, then 120 degrees) and safety mark the orientation to ensure nothing comes loose: The bushings were in decent shape, so I left them for now. They'll get replaced with a set of Powerflex polyurethane bushings in the future. I’ll talk about installing the subframe and some other work in my next post
    6 points
  19. Hey P80 owners! I thought I’d document the installation of my new fuel pump and relay hardwire kit since I haven’t seen a detailed write-up on this yet. It’s a pretty straightforward installation, but I am very amateur when it comes to doing electrical work, so I had to rely on some other knowledgeable community members to get it done right. Now, I want to pass on what I’ve learned for anyone in the future who may install a similar device for their fuel system. Or perhaps, maybe after reading this, you’ll consider upgrading your own fuel pump wiring. In this DIY, I will be showing you how I installed the Deatschwerks “FPHWK” or “Fuel Pump Hard Wire Kit” into my 1998 C70 coupe, and later paired with a new Deatschwerks DW200 fuel pump. I found out while working, there is some variation between the P80 models as to how the fuel pumps are mounted and wired, so you’ll want to make sure you understand your own car first. Compared to other fuel pump DIYs for 850s and X70 cars, my car seemed to have a mix of their features – Probably a result of this being a 97-98 X70 car. NOTE: If you have an AWD car, you’ll have a blast trying to get to the fuel pump anyway, as it’s located underneath the rear seats behind sheet metal. I was fortunate enough to have an easy access panel right in the trunk. Luckily, if you already have an aftermarket fuel pump installed, you will not need to remove it in order to install the relay kit. You just need access to the pump wiring outside of the tank and you may want to put the relay in your interior somewhere. Before I being, just a reminder that I am a complete amateur with wiring, so this may seem like a no-brainer to some people, but I feel it may be helpful for people like me who still equate electricity to some kind of wizard’s magic. By all means, if you see a way to do anything differently or better, please share your experiences! This is a relatively simple install. The hardest part for me was routing the wire in the interior. Oh, and before you do any of this, it might go without saying, but… UNPLUG YOUR BATTERY! Never work on electrical connections until you are sure there is no power running to them, especially when that project involves working near gasoline! What it is... I’ll start by going over the relay kit and what it does exactly… Essentially, this is substituting for your factory fuel pump wiring and providing a more reliable and more direct power supply from your battery to your new, aftermarket, higher output fuel pump. The factory wiring may work in many cases, but you won’t be getting the most of your aftermarket pump investment and you risk overloading the factory wires from the additional draw. The relay is basically a power switch and it uses your factory fuel pump wiring signal to turn it on when the key is put into Ignition Pos. II, sending a new direct 12v line to your pump with less potential voltage drop. Here is the spec sheet straight from Deatschwerks. It’s color-coded so it’s very easy to understand. If you're knowledgeable, you could easily duplicate this with your own relay and wires, but the kit is about $50 and quality is excellent, so it's well worth the peace of mind. Plan on buying some extra 12awg stranded wire and basic crimp connectors, ring terminals, heat srhink, etc. You will likely need to extend the power wire. Mine ended up being about 8 inches short of the battery terminal but as I note later on, I made my connection in the interior for ease of routing wires and accessing the provided fuse. This diagram shows how the relay is added to the circuit. Note how the grey OEM connector is now used to provide a “signal” to the relay. The factory power wire (pink/red on my car) connects to the blue relay wire to tell it to activate when the car is on. The black wire coming out of this connector can simply be terminated. As far as I know, it’s not connected to anything live once the pump wiring is detached. You will have 12v power coming into the relay (red wire) and out of the relay (yellow) where it will connect to the power wire (red) on the fuel sending unit. Both the fuel sending unit and relay have black ground wires that you will want to connect to a solid, bare metal surface in the trunk with ring terminals. If all this sounds confusing, don’t worry, I’ll show you exactly what I did with each wire down below. It took me ages to make sense of this honestly very simple schematic. In the trunk of the C70/S70, under the floor behind the rear seats, you will find this black plastic junction box containing numerous connectors. You will only need to focus on the grey fuel pump connector which is 2nd closest in this picture. The stock power wire coming into the connector on my car is pink, but turns to red as it goes to the fuel sending unit. This may differ on your car. Also worth noting, I think some cars have an additional short ground wire coming out of this connector with a ring terminal on the end. I’m not sure exactly why, but my car does not have that and it seems to be a nonissue. Here is what the relay looks like. The blue signal wire and yellow power-out wire are really short, so you’ll want to place this relay close to where the fuel pump and connector are, unless you want to extend them with more wire. Comparatively, there is plenty of red power wire and a black ground wire that is way longer than needed, in case you want to ground somewhere besides the trunk. Annoyingly, the red power wire comes with the inline 25 amp fuse already attached, so if you plan to route the wire through the car interior like I did, you will need to cut this fuse off and reattach it. Otherwise you will have no chance of fitting it through the various nooks and crannies up to the engine bay. Installing the Relay... Running the power Wire The first thing I did was start running the power wire through the interior. I chose to do this since the wire is critical for the car to run and I want it to be protected from the elements as much as possible. This was by far the most difficult and time-consuming part of the job, but mostly because it required removing a lot of interior panels, carpet, and the passenger seat. I decided to mount my relay on the strut tower on the passenger side (LHD car) where there is a convenient foam pass-through on the upper corner of the rear seat that was perfect for starting the wire. This pic is just behind the plastic side panel in the trunk. Using long piece of thick wire (unbent coat hanger works), I was able to feed the wire diagonally down toward the passenger side door sill. It was a joyous occasion when I finally saw the other end of it! This may take a few tries and you may need to remove the rear seat to loosen the plastic side panel a bit for extra room. S70/V70s might be a little easier with less dead space to blindly feed a wire into. Next, I ran the wire along the door sill under the carpet. Nothing special here, just be careful not to break your interior trim and clips when you remove them. Pretty self-explanatory. After the door sill, I ran the wire under the passenger footwell carpet and then up towards the center stack where the radio is. I originally wanted to put the wire along the firewall, but I could not find any easy way to get around the heater core, so instead I ran the wire behind the radio. With the radio pulled out, it’s easy to tug this wire over to the driver’s side and come out the same area. Working in the driver’s side footwell, this is where I decided to reattach the provided 25a fuse for easy access under the kickpanel (sorry, I forgot to take a pic of that fuse). From that fuse onward, I felt that the provided power wire was not actually long enough to reach my battery, so I purchased more 12awg stranded automotive wire to continue the job. Getting through the firewall was no easy task… or so I initially thought until I discovered this conduit above the dead pedal area that the previous owner ran the boost gauge vacuum line through. It took a little bit of wiggling, but I was finally able to push the wire out into the engine bay. This conduit exits under the brake booster. It’s a little hard to see. I should also mention there was a rubber grommet on the end of the tube that has 4 nipples that can be cut off and used. I’m not sure what Volvo intended to put here if all my lines going in here were not factory... Anyway, I had a seriously hard time getting the thick new 12awg wire through the hole so I just cut the grommet off instead. I really don’t see a need for it unless you are fording rivers in your Volvo, hoping to keep your feet dry. The tube is long and mounted high up in the firewall. After pulling it through the conduit I ran the wire along this… thing. I can’t be bothered to identify it right now but just know it’s a good place to get the wire under the airbox and up to the battery, haha. Finally, after all that fishing, I crimped on a ring terminal and connected it directly to the positive (red) battery terminal. It sandwiches nicely under the factory loom connection. Now we are done running the power wire! This was honestly the hardest work for me, so take a break when you’ve made it this far. Installing the Relay in the Trunk... Now working in the trunk (or under the back seat if you’re unfortunate enough to have AWD) we can start modding the factory fuel pump connector. This step is a little scary because it involves permanently cutting your factory pump wiring. Fear not, you can always re-splice the connections or simply buy a new fuel sending unit for $40~ if you mess something up. It was recommended to me to cut off the fuel pump connector about 3-4 inches away from the end. This leaves you enough wire from the pump to the relay, and the connector to the relay, as these parts will now go their separate ways. I decided the perfect location for my relay was on the strut tower. It’s right in-between the plug and fuel sending unit and aligned with both pretty well. It also provides a good grounding surface if you sand off the paint. I mounted the relay and the ground wires for the pump and the relay itself on this bracket. Everything is held in place by a self-tapping sheet metal screw. The signal and power wires are a bit spaghetti-like, but hopefully my photo is not too confusing. All the extra wire was shoved pretty nicely up in front of the strut tower and zip-tied in place. Instead of a normal crimp connector, I put a “bullet” style quick-disconnect between the fuel pump and yellow power wire so that I can rapidly remove the fuel sending unit again if I need to. To test the relay is working, turn your key to POS. II and listen for the relay to click on and your fuel pump should begin pressurizing the system. You will need to cycle this a few times before the car will start. Then, let it idle for a bit and make sure it doesn’t die. Amazingly I had zero issues and was quite proud I hadn't messed up any of the connections. So… that should be it for installing the relay. Unfortunately I still had work to do installing the aftermarket pump which I thought the previous owner had already done with a Walbro 255, but in fact it still had the factory Bosch pump in place. Thank goodness I checked! Installing Deatschwerks Fuel Pump... I won’t go into too much detail about installing the fuel pump, because there are already plenty of good write-ups and videos out there for various P80 cars and I forgot to take certain pics... and don’t want to take the pump back out, lol). I recommend RobertDIY’s video on replacing the pump here. And here is another great video on it. I do just want to note some things regarding the particular fuel pump I chose and some things I learned during the install. First of all, I recommend a metal trim puller tool for disconnecting the factory fuel lines. It’s the perfect size and shape for prying the connectors up from underneath without damaging anything. Some people use bent screwdrivers... a fork... crowbar... whatever works for you. I also found that oil filter pliers work great for loosening the plastic retaining ring that holds the sending unit in place. It should give you plenty of grip and leverage to work in that tight space from various angles. They do make a tool specifically for this, but there’s no need unless you're a Volvo purist and want all the service tools in your collection, haha. Also worth noting… you’ll want to allow yourself an extra 15 minutes for acorn removal! Volvo is so environmentally conscious, they made this nice little home for your critter friends! I swear this is just part of regular Volvo maintenance at this point, based on how many pictures of other P80s I’ve seen in this exact same situation, lol. A shop vac and screwdriver made quick work of this mess. NOTE: With the sending unit removed from the tank, you may want to cover your fuel tank opening so debris cannot get in, but also to keep fumes from coming out. I duct taped a piece of flat Rubbermaid plastic over the plastic retaining ring and screwed it back into place temporarily as a makeshift cap. Here is the new Deatschwerks DW200 fuel pump and how it compares in size/shape to the factory Bosch unit. The Deatschwerks pump was recommended to me by multiple people as an alternative to the popular Walbro 255. The DW200 has a comparable flow rate but supposedly runs quieter. This pump is good for… more horsepower than most of us would ever need. If you think you need more, go for a DW300. When fitting the DW200 into the factory plastic housing, I did have to dremel out most of the ribs so the larger diameter pump could fit snugly down into the tube. You can use any fuel sock you prefer so long as it’s clean and it fits well in your tank. I had no issues with the DW200’s additional length because it extends upward into the sending unit. The DW200 pump connects directly into the stock plug in the sending unit, so there’s no need to swap anything out here. I’ve heard from some people that the Deatschwerks pump has reverse polarity, but after doing a bench test with my battery and a bucket of acetone, I found that the pump ran the same direction as stock. I was also informed that despite being lower gauge wire from the pump to the 12 gauge relay kit, it’s not a big issue as the voltage drops would be negligible. You are good to use the connector without any modification.Just make sure your pump isn't running backwards or you'll have to rewire the plug! One thing I did find kind of strange was this sort of grounding contraption that runs from the connector and attaches to the outlet tubes and fuel pump body with metal springs. I’m not entirely sure what this is for, but I assume is has something to do with protecting against static electricity. It’s probably a safety device that’s important to retain, which is another reason I’d recommend leaving the factory plug in place if you can. I saw no mention of this wire in other fuel pump DIYs so I thought I'd add it here. Once it’s all re-installed and the cover panel is in place, the fuel pump upgrade is complete! I slapped a shiny DW sticker on there so potential future owners don’t have to second-guess what’s inside the tank like I had to. With the relay mounted on the strut tower, I had no clearance issues putting the protector and trunk interior back together. I don't know what that little ground wire is for that's connected to the top of the metal plate... but it was there when I took everything apart so I put it back where I found it. With the new pump, my car immediately behaved a lot better than before. It already had a RICA ECU tune and green injectors, but a stock fuel pump where it should have been upgraded already. My power delivery is definitely smoother and more consistent but the real test will be once I’ve got my new turbo and VA5T ECU next year. I must say, I am very pleased with the Deatschwerks pump. It is noticeably louder than stock, but not “loud” at all, like some Walbro users will often say. If anything, it actually makes cool spaceship sounds as it whirrs up under acceleration. All-in-all a very worthwhile upgrade and hopefully it should last. I’m hoping my childish wiring is robust enough too. Sorry for the extremely wordy and somewhat scatterbrained presentation, but I hope I helped someone out there who is in my same situation. Coming from zero electrical experience whatsoever, this was a bit overwhelming at times and I needed it explained to me about 100 times from various people before it finally clicked in my head. I’m hoping I can pass on this info and show you that it is really simple, it just takes a bit of patience and the right tools! This is also my first ever post on these forums, so I apologize if i didn't get this in the right place!
    5 points
  20. I've been away a good while but the wagons keep rolling. Still have the black 98 project good grief that I RN swapped many moons ago, still 18T and ARD Blue Tune(lol, works great?), currently 220,000 miles, 70k on the RN swap build. Sold it to my buddy for a few years, got hit at a light and sat due to bent tailgate. I got it back two years ago and swapped XC bumpers from my old nautic xc, did a bunch of regular work to it since but mostly just drive it. My old nautic blue 98 xc died many years ago due to sibling neglect, she has been relegated to parts car. Still have pretty much whole thing but don't think it's worth fixing, probably take some parts off and scrap it soon. I bought a 240 for a simpler Volvo experience and quite love the contrast between it and the V70. Did a cheap headlight change, B Cam, new exhaust, got 2 M47s in the garage with full swap kit ready. Last two years I rebuilt my RX7 Turbo 2 again, added a 2nd Gen Cummins Dually and Crossfire Injection Corvette!! Still tinkering with motorcycles too. I have a list of stuff to do to the V70, some routine maintenance, possible paint or at least dip, thinking about finally doing the M66 swap and big turbo build that I've been squirreling away parts for. It's an old car and shows, clear coat is falling off, a lot of quirks inside with doors, locks, windows,etc... But this thing still just runs, drives great and still hauls ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOTOAD, quite happy that it's held up to the test of time despite being used hard and put away wet regularly. Anyways just wanted to say hi, been reading around lately and really glad to see some of the same guys still here, some coming back after a while like me, glad to see that you guys don't stop rolling. Here is what it looked like when I got it back, pretty much the same. I have a photo of the smashed rear somewhere. Tailgate and bumper swap
    5 points
  21. 40 degrees in Wisconsin means we can wash the car outside! My shelves are getting emptier with parts going back on the e30 and it looking like a car again. I also assembled one of my headlights. Revising a couple parts on it to make it perfect, but it's a really cool feeling to see it assembled and the projector adapter fitting together like I wanted it to. I shared the products to a few places yesterday and got a lot of amazing feedback.
    5 points
  22. Out with the old and in with the new.
    5 points
  23. forget if i posted this but here is the family car: If you wanted to know... 2014 XC90 (They all have the 3.2L the final year) AWD. Chestnut red/brown sovergn leather. Every package/option even the wood wheel and the 19" RIMZZZ Got 90k on it now and its been great. K&N filter, oem accessory lights, thule roof box and some LEDs
    5 points
  24. for people who still use this forum.. i'm back bois
    5 points
  25. It's been a while since I've posted for y'all, but I picked up a 2005 BMW X5 3.0 with 192k, body damage, and a bunch of small electrical issues and engine/trans things to fix. It's all been cleared up and I wanted to make this X5 a luxury/ish offroader. I think it's mostly there. All engine related leaks have been sorted, doesn't leak a drop of fluids. Trans filter and gasket are done, all electrical gremlins have been repaired. Rear suspension has been completely refurbished (the rear ball joints were blown out to near catastrophic failure). I lifted it using a 40mm body lift, it has 20mm H&R spacers all around, and oversized 265/70R17 All terrains on it. Added wide angle mirrors, full LED tails and brake lights, headlights have been completely restored with new lenses and bulbs. GM3 module was replaced (rear windows were not functioning) as well as the ALC module (which was preventing the driver's light from coming on). Came with a knockoff key from some junk key shop, so I bought the AK90 programmer for new keys, ordered 2 cut keys on ebay for 90 bucks, and now they are fully functional OEM looking keys without an issue. Added a full touchscreen android unit that is able to run android auto. I really really love this thing, and i've put on about 1500 miles with all new fluids and the overhaul has been done, it's really been a great SUV for lugging stuff around. The only other thing I would like to do is to get a metal offroad bumper for it, since the mounting brackets on this plastic bumper are all separated. but I am very very happy with this X5 so far. Looking forward to winter with this X-Drive.
    5 points
  26. remember when we would flood TB and create all kinds of shit lol and Vice Versa.
    5 points
  27. Okay, now it's actually time for the subframe installation and repairs to the damage caused by the control arm coming out. I drove to my buddy's house to do the work in his driveway. On Saturday morning, I got my car up on jack stands, then got the HF engine bar in place, and started disassembly to remove the subframe, the control arms, the steering rack + tie rods, and the motor/transmission mounts. The front swaybar (stock 20mm with Energy Suspension poly bushings) would come out and get transferred over to the new subframe. By Saturday evening, I had the old parts removed and the new subframe assembly nearly ready to install. To get the AWD-style front engine mount to bolt onto the FWD subframe, there is a small nub on the bottom that contacts the control arm bushing bracket. It quickly gets trimmed off, and problem solved: Starting again on Sunday morning, the new subframe had everything installed, and ready to get installed. Here's the list of new parts for anyone who is interested: Custom powder-coated FWD subframe w/ AWD transmission mount bracket and BNE Dynamics Delrin subframe bushings, OEM engine mounts, OEM 99 AWD transmission mount, TRW remanufactured FWD steering rack with inner tie rods, TRW outer tie rods, Lemforder end links, 93 850 aluminum control arms, new Meyle HD ball joints, new OEM ball joint bolts, and new hardware for everything else. Here is where things started to go sideways... With the subframe lined up and close to installed, I realized the rear engine mount on the FWD steering rack was hitting the downpipe and preventing the rack from moving upwards into position: Knowing that I would have to remove the whole assembly, that was enough to stop my progress for the weekend. Here's how it sat for a week until I could get back to work on it Now, in the process of removing the power steering feed line from the rack a 2nd time in the weekend, the o-ring that seals the line into the the rack was damaged. So I looked up the part number, called the local dealership and ordered a couple of o-rings. I got the o-rings picked up and the next weekend, I started work on my car again. Once the rack/subframe assembly was out of the car, I cut the rear engine mount bracket off the steering rack: Shot it with some black paint to make the cut blend in and soothe my OCD after hacking up a brand new steering rack: When I went to install the new o-ring on the power steering feed line, it was too small and didn't fit. Turns out, I gave them the wrong part number . I had to re-order the right o-rings, so that stopped my progress on re-assembling the subframe for the weekend. When the control arm came out and the wheel got ripped backwards, the fender was yanked outwards as well. I posted some photos of the cosmetic damage in my earlier post. What also happened was that the lower fender bolt bracket got yanked out of the chassis and the captive nut was broken. You can see that at the bottom of the fender here: I was able to find a "license plate nut" at Advance Auto Parts that fit properly and allowed me to bolt the fender back in place. The fender still needs to be replaced, but this kept the lower portion from flapping around as badly as it did before. I also took the opportunity to drain my ~2 year old OEM transmission fluid and replace with Redline Lightweight Shockproof. This calibrated syringe from FCP makes providing the proper 2.1 L of fluid incredibly easy and was a great purchase. I had also noticed that the top mount of the passenger side coilover had gotten a small bend in the accident. Given that my CX Racing coils had been installed for a while and were starting to get rusty, so I decided to replace both front coilovers to be safe. As an unplanned purchase, I couldn't justify JRZs, or even BCs, so I decided to give the Maxspeedingrods non-dampening adjustable coilovers a chance. At $270 shipped, it was worth the gamble. The shipped super quickly, which really was a pleasant surprise for free shipping. They looked alright so I got them installed on the car - I'll share some more detailed thoughts if anyone is interested. I HATE the way the orange powdercoating looks on the car compared to the black CX coils, but it's not that big a deal in the grand scheme of things. Then, on the THIRD weekend of this project, I had the correct PS o-ring and was able to get everything reassembled. Safe to say, it made a tremendous improvement to how the car rides and handles. Between the delrin subframe bushings, fresh control arms, new steering rack / tie rods, the front end feel of the car is totally transformed for the better. My dash mounts are pretty destroyed, and this nearly eliminated all the squeaking over rough roads. Next post I'll talk about alignment / new tires / unexpected issues portion of the subframe install saga...
    5 points
  28. I might be able to help you out, currently just doing PAP-smears out the back of the wagon in a Walmart parking lot but I’m looking to expand into mobile alignment as well.
    5 points
  29. He had a thread on my X1/9 forum for that build - very nicely done all over. $43K is a nice price for an X1/9 K/swap. They'll have to bury me in mine, I'm never selling it....
    5 points
  30. Got something from a friend to make the suspension job on the 850 easier.
    5 points
  31. Watch out you'll double the mileage in two months at this pace. Custom stealth door pod for the WB. Paint is custom matched to the factory mirror cap.
    5 points
  32. 850's turn. The plan subframe bushing inserts, delta link bushings, inner tie rods, rebuild the turbo, front and rear engine mounts, heater hoses, turbo coolant hoses, and replace the evaporator/fix dash mounts. It was disgusting. Pushing so much oil through. I tried rebuilding it but the inner rubber o-ring I got seemed like it was too big and the cartridge wouldn't go in and trashed the o-ring. Decided I didn't have time to dick around with it and bought a rebuilt CHRA. Everything else looks awesome after soaking in simple green for a few days. This job wasn't terrible. Used the OEM tool to remove them. The tool worked worth a shit for pressing the new ones in and I spent way more time than I should have trying to make it work. Eventually with a hammer and block of wood the new ones went in in about 15 mins. e30 is on daily duty while I wrap up the 850. And it's pretty fantastic.
    4 points
  33. I would rather have no power steering.
    4 points
  34. I've been sitting on this R spoiler for several years now, thinking "one day, I'll get it painted." I think that it's one of my favorite parts on the car...
    4 points
  35. M66 Swap parts still trickling in, got the clutch hydraulics, master, slave and line as well as the 850R clutch kit for the pressure plate, the disc will be resold.
    4 points
  36. OEM roof rails, got too cold/dark to deal with swapping the box over. Also ditched the sunroof visor that came with the car.
    4 points
  37. Not sure if this is allowed with how people like to talk about their feelings these days, but I was summoned yet no longer have a Volvo. So here I am.
    4 points
  38. The more I read about bench bleeding on the e30 it seems to be pretty evenly split. But I read severaly people say that with a power bleeder (not vacuum bleeder) that bench bleeding wasn't necessary. Print No. 2 came out almost perfect yesterday. My measurements for the holes were a mm off but simply enlarged them with a drill bit. The 944 booster sits flush against the firewall and pushes against the clutch hose from the reservoir. Made a 5mm spacer and it fits much better!
    4 points
  39. Drove to my parents house and back in the snow. Mostly just slush and some ice buildup on the road, but the front of the car was packed snow. Back home now with no snow in Everett currently. Temp is dropping quickly now. It is supposed to be down to 9F for a low on Tuesday. Turbo weather.
    4 points
  40. That's too bad on the accident - good thing no injuries though. I spent some time getting the nuke catch can installed. I'm using 5/8 parker superflex on push to lock an10 fittings. I modified the pcv can with a vacuum fitting and one-way pierburg check valve to pull vacuum when no boost. Ditched the PTC element. I wanted to recondition my TME strut bar that i've had for several years and a couple 850s. I started by stripping and powder coating the strut tower plates and polishing the bar. I grabbed some new stainless bolts to finish it off. I also got the air box refitted with C70 lid and 3" MAF. I'm an amateur when it comes to powder coating. I'm happy with how these came out though. I painted the front calipers. I kick myself for not powder coating them before I installed them... but I can't be bothered to go through that hassle now. The paint will have to do. Happy Holidays!
    4 points
  41. 4 points
  42. Waiting on a couple things before I can reassemble the HVAC box. In the meantime I picked up a 1000lb hydraulic table from HF and used that to drop the complete engine from the car rather than using a hoist. It may have taken a little bit longer, but the e30 is similar to the 850 in that the engine needs to come out at a pretty extreme angle. I was able to avoid the hassle and frustrations of using a hoist at least. I have some areas of rust that need addressed in the engine bay and am taking this opportunity to strip the entire engine bay and respray it. Stripping off all the seam sealer. Patch one rust spot and then other areas are just surface so those will be ground down and spray with rust encapsulator.
    4 points
  43. Today I had to work outside, made me feel 18 again. You know the time without a garage living in an apartment. Anyway, I needed the front subframe, gearbox and angle drive so I can start dialing in my prop-shaft. Well it's a long time project. I don't have deep pockets, trying to get YT channel to catch on so I can get some cash from them. It's going to be a bad a$$ car, about 400+hp, gutted interior, welded visco, LSD in front and aiming for 2500 Lbs but I don't think I'll get it that light. More likely around 2700 Lbs but it still will move 😉
    4 points